Applying Brain-Based Learning Research to the Learning Environment

Applying Brain-Based Learning Research to the Learning Environment

Training and education professionals are always looking for new ways to creatively share concepts and information with their learners. Unfortunately, there is no one strategy that will turn classroom learning events into the utopia that trainers and adult educators strive for — 100 percent success related to the participant and student acquisition and retention of everything to which they are exposed. This is why they know that using a variety of strategies and changing their tools and routine regularly is crucial for learning success in the classroom.

Applying Brain-Based Learning Research to the Learning Environment by The Creative Trainer - Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Adult Learning AuthorApplying Brain-Based Learning Research to the Learning Environment by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Adult Learning Author

Luckily, there are exciting neuroscientific studies and continued developments in cognitive psychology related to learning going on that can help. Some of the research completed thus far certainly points to opportunities for application in the classroom even though it is ongoing and there is widespread discussion about the applicability to education and training. One thing that seems to have surfaced is that the classroom environment is certainly a major factor in learning. Still, the human brain far too complex to categorically state that by doing this or that, you will end up with a specific result so much more needs to be explored.

What seems to be obvious to numerous researchers is that certain classroom elements can potentially aid learning and long-term memory development. Many trainers and adult educators are realizing that they can apply lessons learned by the neuroscientists to their classrooms.

For example, through the use of environmental elements such as color, sound, motion, light, and smells and the addition of other factors like engagement, novelty, and fun to the classroom, participants potentially better gain, retain, recall and use what they experience. This is because these factors have been shown to impact brain neuron stimulation which aids memory formation and the ability to later recall and use what was learned.

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