The Impact of a Brain-Based Environment on Learning

The Impact of a Brain-Based Environment on Learning

Brain-based learning researchers continue to discover the importance that environmental factors such as color, sound, music, light, aromas, images, and fun have on the human brain.

To capitalize on research findings related to adult learning theory (andragogy) and brain-based learning, you can design your learning environments in a manner where participants have maximum access to information. To do this, plan activities in which participants can best use their five senses to receive and process information.

Additionally, your training environment should complement the subject matter as close as possible. To accomplish this, consider the audience, organizational culture, subject matter, and expected outcomes for the training when creating your design. With these factors in mind, set out to create a learning utopia in which all the elements of brain-based learning are addressed to your fullest capability. Even if you have only indirect control over the room (e.g. a hotel or conference room) in which training will take place, you can still incorporate a variety of creative ideas for creating a stimulating learning environment.

The Impact of a Brain-Based Environment on Learning by The Creative Trainer - Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Creative Training AuthorThe Impact of a Brain-Based Environment on Learning by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas

The wonderful thing about being a creative trainer is that through a little innovation, you can procure and use a variety of inexpensive tools to complement your training. You can also reconfigure seating and in some cases, lighting, to better accommodate participants and learning needs.

Often, for a small amount of time and money (less than $50 dollars), you can obtain decorations, materials, and props related to your training topic that will add pizzazz to your classroom. In doing so, you will be helping to better attract and hold attention while relaying your thoughts and ideas to learners.

The key to enhancing and enriching your training vestibule is to add variety and novelty while fully engaging learners. Your goal should be to entice, challenge, raise emotion, and stimulate their brains to a point where the transfer of training to the workplace is a natural outcome.

To make a positive first impression on your trainees, you simply have to do some advance planning and preparation. To start with, locate some related inspirational quotes by well know people that relate to your topic. Either have a graphics company create an assortment of professional looking posters or produce your own visually stimulating flip charts or slides. Use a variety of bright colors, borders, clip art, photos, or other images. Post sayings around the room at eye level to reinforce the program theme.

For additional creative ideas and strategies for creating a stimulating learning environment, get copies of The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning and Training Workshop Essentials: Designing, Developing, and Delivering Learning That Gets Results by Robert W. Lucas.

What Are Flipcharts (Flip Charts)?

What Are Flipcharts (Flip Charts)?

Flipcharts (or flip charts) are inexpensive, portable, and user-friendly. They also come in handy for capturing group comments, brainstorming, and making messages visual during presentations or training and educational sessions. These classic tools of the classroom have not lost their value for displaying information and capturing or exchanging ideas.

When designing flipcharts for use in a classroom or meeting, consider adding creative graphic images and using various colored markers or creative colorful borders to enhance the visual impact of your flip charts. As an alternative to this approach, you can purchase rolls of colorful and graphic masking tape to add pizzazz to the edges of each page. These types of creative training techniques help create brain-based learning environments that help stimulate brain neurons and can potentially help aid learning and retention.

Flipcharts or Flip Charts - What Are They?Definition: A flipchart (or flip chart) is a series of paper sheets that are bonded together at the top.

Format: They can be plain sheets of paper, lined like a sheet of writing paper, or have grids on them. Often the pads have two punched holes along the top edge of the pad to allow hanging on various types of flip chart easels. They also come in a smaller tabletop format with a cardboard backing that allows them to stand on tables for small group presentations or group activities.

Color: The most common type is flip chart paper is white; However, you can also obtain pads of paper in yellow and blue.

Size: The most common size is 27″ X 35,” but pads are available in other sizes.

Variations: Some brands have adhesive strips along the back of each page (like a sticky note pad) to allow hanging on walls without the use of tape or pins. There is a downside to this variety because rolling and reusing and storing prepared sheets with this type of paper is challenging because of the sticky edge on the back of each sheet.

For more information on flip charts, easels, markers, and how to make, use, transport, and store flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

Creativity Quote – Mary Lou Cook

Creativity Quote – Mary Lou Cook

Creativity in training, the workplace, and life is about opening the mind to new opportunities and potential. By placing yourself in an environment where you will experience new or innovative ideas, information, challenges, and risks.

“Creativity is inventing experimenting, growing, taking risks, breaking rules, making mistakes, and having fun.” Quote by Mary Lou Cook

Creativity Quote – Mary Lou Cook by The Creative Trainer

You can create a sense of apprehension, excitement, and anticipation that can be filled by experimenting and trying new things.  Therefore, this leads to new sensory exposure and expanded activity in the brain as you assimilate the new and match it to the current memories, knowledge, skills, and experiences.

Creativity Quote - Mary Lou Cook

About This Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Further, Robert Lucas was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Robert W. Lucas has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

5 Ways to Enhance Your Presentation Flip Charts with Color, Shapes, Borders and Images

5 Ways to Enhance Your Presentation Flip Charts with Color, Shapes, Borders, and Images

There has been quite a bit of research on the impact of color, images, and other graphic additions and the effect that they have on the human brain. Unfortunately, many trainers and educators fail to consider the potential for using visual elements to stimulate brain neurons. Nor do they recognize that adding a splash of different hues to their presentation flip chart pages might actually contribute to learning. The following chart shows the emotions communicated in various colors.

COLOR

EMOTION/MESSAGE

Red Stimulates and evokes excitement, passion, power, energy,   anger, intensity.  Also, it can indicate   “stop,” negativity, financial trouble, or shortage.
Yellow Indicates caution, warmth, mellowness, positive meaning,   optimism, and cheerfulness. It can also stimulate thinking and visioning.
Dark Blue Depending on the shade, you can relax, soothe, indicate maturity, and evoke trust, and tranquility or peace.
Light Blue Cool, youthful, or masculine images can be projected.
Purple Projects assertiveness or boldness, youthfulness, and contemporary image. Often used as a sign of royalty, richness, spirituality,   or power.
Orange It can indicate high energy or enthusiasm. Emotional and sometimes stimulates positive thinking. The organic image can result.
Brown An earth-tone that creates a feeling of security,   wholesomeness, strength, support, and a lack of pretentiousness.
Green Can remind of nature, productivity, positive image, moving forward or “go,” comforting, growth, or financial success or prosperity. Also, can give a feeling of balance.
Gold/Silver Illustrates prestige, status, wealth, elegance, or conservative image.
Pink Projects a youthful, feminine, or warm image.
White Typically used to illustrate purity, cleanliness, honesty,   wholesomeness, enhance colors used, and provide visual relaxation.
Black It represents a lack of color. It creates a sense of independence, completeness, and solidarity. Often used to indicate financial success, death, seriousness, or heaviness of the situation.

Enhance Your Presentation Flip Charts by The Creative Trainer

Take advantage of what researchers have discovered about using colors and visual elements to enhance your learning environment and aid in the acquisition and retaining of information.

Consider the following presentation flip chart tips when you design your next training or presentation visual aids.

1. Use Colored Icons or Bullets in various shapes that relate to your topic in order to visually tie to written text and the program theme. Here are some examples:

• For training on telephone skills, use small telephones or headsets;
• For customer service skills, use small smiley faces or faces with various expressions;
• For travel-related training, use cars, boats, ships, airplanes, etc.
• For EEO or legal training, use justice scales; and
• For technical skills, use small computers or other equipment.

presentation flip chart tips, creative training techniques, brain based learning2. Use Colored Shapes Around Text to set off the words from the surrounding material. For example, you might use clouds, stars, circles, bursting bombs, or geometric shapes drawn in various colors to highlight a concept, word, or phrase.

3. Attach Key Concepts Written on Cut Out Shapes that you then attach to the page with either tape, Velcro, or artist’s adhesive. For example, a creative training content review activity where “bright ideas” might be elicited from learners and written on light bulb cut-outs in various colors. Learners could then come up, attach their idea to a sheet of paper, and discuss their idea. Post the pages for everyone to view and note during breaks.

4. Add Borders to flip chart pages with either colored markers or colored tape. Ypresentation flip chart tips, creative training techniques, brain based learningou can tie to program themes by adding images related to the topic. For example, if you are discussing selling or doing business in another country, choose images that relate to that country.

5. Add Images that are done in various colors. Cartoon characters, caricatures, simple stick figures, and similar figures are great. Go to Microsoft Word® toolbar to Insert/ Picture/Clip Art for ideas. If you cannot draw well and have an overhead projector still sitting around, you can make copies of images on transparency film, project it onto a flip chart page and trace it! You can also create a slide and project it on paper to trace.

By using these simple flip chart presentation tips when designing and developing your flip charts for learning events, you potentially increase the opportunities for learners to gain, retain, recall, and use what they learn.

 

 

Creativity Quote – Maya Angelou

Creativity Quote – Maya Angelou

Adding brain-based learning strategies into training sessions by engaging your creativity in the design, development, and delivery of program content is a perfect way to engage adult learners.

Many trainers and adult educators shy away from building in activities, games, novelty, and other fun factors for fear that they might be seen as frivolous or a waste of time. The key is to ensure that everything that you use, do, or say in your session has a purpose and is focused on accomplishing stated learning objectives.

Creativity Quote – Maya Angelou by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author, and Training Industry Blogger

I have been using accelerated or active learning strategies and sharing ideas with other trainers and adult educators in professional development programs for over four decades will success. Using such elements not only engages learners and makes the program content more fulfilling for them, but it also keeps me mentally alert and engaged as I design new processes and monitor their outcome in the classroom.

As Maya Angelou said:Creativity Quote - Maya Angelou

For ideas and strategies on ways to use creativity in you adult learning sessions through the application of brain-based and adult learning research get copies of The Creative Trainer: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning; The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators; Energize Your Training: Creative Techniques to Engage Learners; and Creative Learning: Activities and Games That Really Engage People.

Learn This Adult Learning Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Robert Lucas was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Robert W. Lucas has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

Six Factors Affecting Active Learning

Six Factors Affecting Active Learning

Active, brain-based, experiential, and accelerated learning are terms used for training initiatives that involve getting learners to become active participants in your sessions. Various theories and research related to adult learning and brain-based learning indicate that through active involvement, participants become more vested in the session outcomes and are more likely to gain, retain, recall and use what they experience.

Six Factors Affecting Active Learning

Six Factors Affecting Active Learning by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Adulting Learning Author

Consider the following factors when you sit down to create activities and initiatives that will involve and stimulate your learners.

Audience Makeup.

Ensure that you choose activities and content that are appropriate for the group you will be facilitating. Some activities (e.g. role-play) work best when participants know one another well or are comfortable with one another. Talk to program sponsors and/or participants in advance when possible and before you design your content and activities in order to determine who will comprise your audience.

Participant Knowledge and Experience Levels. 

To successfully build on what learners know, you must first determine current capabilities. You can do this through a training needs assessment process that is part of a standard instructional systems design (ADDIE) process. Also, ensure that the planned activity suits the audience level (e.g. frontline employee, supervisor, manager, or executive). Otherwise, you can easily either intimidate or bore your learners with your planned activities.

Desired Involvement.

Decide how, and to what extent, you want to involve participants. While much self-discovery is possible, you will need to intermingle your own involvement with that of your learners.

Available Time.

One mark of a professional creative trainer is to be able to accomplish established learning objectives and planned activities within the allotted timeframe in a seemingly effortless manner. When selecting activities, ensure that the time limit set is realistic and allows for successful completion and debriefing without intruding on other planned program segments.

Training Venue.

Take care to select a facility that has space and equipment needed to conduct planned activities. When possible, actually visit the site so that you can visualize layout and activities. Also, talk to the people who will do the room set up for the session to ensure that they understand your needs. Do not count on a third-party relaying your needs to setup people.

Group Size.

Choose activities that are appropriate for the size of your audience and ensure that co-facilitators are planned if necessary.

If you effectively plan and oversee the activity process, chances are that learners will feel a sense of accomplishment and that learning will more likely occur.

Learn This Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Robert Lucas was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Robert W. Lucas has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

Creativity Quote – Robert W. Lucas

Creativity Quote – Robert W. Lucas

Trainers who truly believe that they are creative and tap into brain-based learning research. To engage with their learners through a variety of active learning strategies. Robert W. Lucas has been quoted as saying “Creativity is a state of mind!”

Creativity Quote – Robert W. Lucas by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas

These trainers are ALWAYS going to be a step ahead of their peers who do not apply such knowledge. This is because learning professionals who have taken time to study how the human brain best processes. They simply try to apply information to understand the importance of creating an environment in which learners become active participants. Such environments use elements such as movement, motion, sound/music, light, color, novelty, engagement, and fun. Therefore this can stimulate brain neurons. These elements play a key role in helping gain and hold learner interest. And, once attention is focused, learners are better able to gain, retain, recall, and use what they have learned. Creativty Quotes - Robert W. Lucas

For creative resources that can add sizzle and effectiveness to any classroom learning environment, get a copy of The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning and Energize Your Training: Creative Techniques to Engage Learners. 

Learn This Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Robert Lucas was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Robert W. Lucas has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

Using Games to Engage and Energize Adult Learners

Using Games to Engage and Energize Adult Learners

Using Games to Engage and Energize Adult Learners

Using games to engage and energize adult learners is an effective creative training strategy. However, the qualifier to that statement is “if you use the game correctly.” During the past four-plus decades I have facilitated hundreds of adult learning events. In those sessions, I have used games and dozens of other brain-based learning strategies. My purpose was not to entertain or provide “busy work,” as I have seen other trainers and adult educators do over the years. Instead, my intent was to get participants actively engaged in the learning process. I was also focused on reinforcing key concepts and generating topic related ideas and strategies. I wanted learners to recall and use what they experienced once they left the classroom.

If you want to use games in your own sessions, I suggest that you first learn how to effectively accomplish learning goals with this technique. Look to experts like Thiagi for ideas on how to select, develop and execute games. Also, choose a game that will help support and reinforce your learning objectives. Next, make sure that you familiarize yourself with the rules and structure of the game and rehearse facilitating it before learners arrive.

Related to facilitating a game, I suggest that you avoid statements, such as, “We’re now going to participate in a game” or “Let’s form groups so that we can play a game.” Adults and their supervisors have too many important things to do to feel that they are going to participate in what they may perceive as a frivolous activity. Instead of announcing this, form groups in a creative manner. Once learners are in groups, explain that they are going to explore key concepts, identify strategies, or whatever your goal for the game will be, through a group activity. Then, visually display the rules on a flip chart, slide or handout. This will aid in understanding and reduce confusion or forgetting the objectives later. As the game proceeds, monitor activity, answer questions, remind of time constraints and inject any additional necessary comments or assistance necessary.

The key to using games to engage and energize adult learners is to make the games effective. Keep things upbeat, fun and focused on learning objectives. Strive to engage, motivate and inspire your learners by creating an atmosphere that stimulates your learner’s brains. Tap into a variety of brain-based elements to accomplish this. For example, use music, bells, whistles, novelty, rewards and other reinforcement, and active participation, as appropriate. Let learners laugh, inject, create, and otherwise become an active part of the learning process.

For additional using games to engage and energize adult learners and identifying other creative training strategies based on brain-based learning research, search this blog for related articles on those topics. Also, check out The Creative Training Idea Books: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning and Energize Your Training: Creative Techniques to Engage Learners.

6 Strategies for Energizing Learners and Generating Enthusiasm

6 Strategies for Energizing Learners and Generating Enthusiasm

There are many ways to spark excitement, energize learners, and generate enthusiasm in your sessions. Take the time to search out and develop strategies and techniques that are innovative and require learners to think while having fun and enjoying their experience. So let’s take a look at 6 Strategies for Energizing Learners and Generating Enthusiasm!

Energizing Learners and Generating Enthusiasm

Here are six ways that you can help stimulate enthusiasm in your learning events.

6 Strategies for Energizing Learners and Generating Enthusiasm

1.  Be enthusiastic about your facilitation.

Through your own interest and excitement, you can help engage and stimulate learners. If learners perceive that you are just a “talking head” who is regurgitating memorized information or parroting what is on your slides, they will likely tune out early in the session and you will not regain their attention.

Keep your information and delivery format fresh by updating and adding to content and design on a regular basis. For example, if you deliver the same content regularly (e.g. new hire orientation), change the icebreaker or other activities that you use periodically. This will require you to stay alert and think about what you need to do, thereby keeping you alert and making your delivery seem new and more stimulating.

2.  Plan and deliver activities that add value.

Your goal is the overall accomplishment of learning objectives. Do not add activities or other content and training aids just because they are fun or you like them. Make sure that anything you do, say or use in your programs is relevant to session content, aids learning, and is tied directly to desired learning outcomes.

3.  Ensure that initiatives are well organized.

Take time to prepare and practice before learners arrive. One of the worst things that a facilitator can do is to stumble along, rely heavily on notes and training aids, and appear uncertain about what they should do or say next. Become proficient with the information and training aids that you will use and do not spend time learning while participants are present.

4.  Clearly and concisely deliver directions.

To ensure that participants get the maximum benefit from all activity in a session, take the time to explain what learners are to do. Since people are either visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learners (or some combination of the three) prepare instructions in several formats to ensure everyone gets what you want them to do. For example, instead of just verbally sharing activity instructions, put them in writing on a handout, flip chart, or slide and discuss them as you show the training aids. Leave the instructions on display during the activity so that learners can refer back to them for clarification if needed.

5.  Communicate the purpose and Added Value And Results For Me (AVAR-FM) of the activity.

It is crucial that learners have the value of what they are doing explained so that they will understand potential benefits. Tell them exactly what benefits they will personally gain from the information you provide.

Making an assumption that the objective of an activity should be obvious could be a serious mistake. Remember that people learn and process information differently.

6.  Solicit questions, comments, or suggestions.

Before participants begin an activity, take the time to ask if everything is clear and to determine if all their questions related to the activity be answered before they begin.

Throughout your session, you also provide multiple opportunities for learners to provide feedback and suggestions on how your facilitation of content or activities might be enhanced to add value. By effectively planning your session content and activities and setting expectations for learners, you are more likely to tie into learner motivation and generate enthusiasm for your programs. Since brain-based learning research shows that by actively engaging learners, you increase the potential for more effective learning and memory enhancement; your sessions will likely be better received.

6 Strategies for Energizing Learners and Generating Enthusiasm by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Brain-Based Adult Training Author

For additional ideas on how to effectively engage learners during training and educational events, get a copy of The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning or Creative Learning: Activities and Games That Really Engage People.

Learn This Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Robert Lucas was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Robert W. Lucas has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

Experiential Learning Helps with Retention

Experiential Learning Is Key To Helping Adult Learners Retain and Use What They Experience

Experiential Learning Helps with Retention

Accelerated learning strategies (e.g. adult learning games and activities, role play, visioning exercises, team building games, outdoor group activities [ROPES course], and similar techniques) applied in an adult learning environment are paramount to assisting in memory development.

Experiential Learning Is Key To Helping Adult Learners Retain and Use What They Experience by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author, and Blogger

According to some brain-based learning researchers, such active learning exercises potentially help strengthen memory formation through learner engagement but also help reinforce concepts shared through more traditional training means.

For more information and ideas on how to create your own active learning training environment, click here.

‘Experiential Learning Helps with Retention’ About This Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Robert Lucas was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Robert W. Lucas has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.