Flip Chart 101 – Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

Flip Chart 101 – Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

Rather than displaying prepared flipcharts before you are ready to discuss them, try using the “revelation” technique. As when showing one line of PowerPoint text at a time, you can use a similar technique with flip charts.

Flip Chart 101 - Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

To use the revelation technique, form a small circle of masking tape and attach it to the bottom corners of the page you are displaying — so that the sticky part faces out away from the wall or easel.  Next, bring the taped area up and attach it just below the title line of your page so that the rest of the text remains covered. Thus, you are using the bottom portion of the page as its own cover.

As you are ready to discuss a point, move the taped edge down to display the next line.

For additional ideas on how to effectively design, develop, use, transport, and store flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

Meet Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Brain-Based Adult Training Author

Learn All About Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas Now and Understand Why He is an Authority in the Creative Training Skills Industry!

Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas has been a trainer, presenter, customer service expert, and adult educator for over four decades. He has written hundreds of articles on training, writing, self-publishing, and workplace learning skills and issues. He is also an award-winning author. Robert W. Lucas has written thirty-seven books. The book topics included: writing, relationships, customer service, brain-based learning,  and creative training strategies, interpersonal communication, diversity, and supervisory skills. Additionally, he has contributed articles, chapters, and activities to eighteen compilation books. Mr. Lucas is retired from the U.S. Marine Corps in 1991 after twenty-two years of active and reserve service.

Creative Flip Chart Review in Training

Creative Flip Chart Review in Training

Flip charts are a great way to present a visual record of progress made in a session. Without embarrassing themselves or disturbing others, those who arrive late or who need to find out what happened in the meeting can refer to the meeting’s flip charts if they’ve been posted on the walls. Participants can look around the room and see what has been discussed thus far.

Creative Flip Chart Review in Training

A savvy facilitator can easily walk to a point at a specific chart or item and reinforce or refer to it throughout the session. They can do so without interrupting the flow of content being delivered; as when they have to scan back through slides or other visual materials to revisit or re-emphasize a previous point.

Creative Flip Chart Review in Training by The Creative Trainer

Posting flip chart pages throughout the session provide for an excellent silent review process. This is not possible with slides or other computer graphic material that has to be searched to project it.

Additionally, by posting pages during a session, they can be used for later review. For example, at the end of the session, the facilitator can play a game in which participants have to answer questions or discuss issues or points brought out during the program. As the game progresses, participants can refer to the posted information as “cheat sheets.”

For additional creative ideas on using flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and Team Facilitators by Robert W. Lucas

 

Creative Flip Chart Idea – Important Issues Page

Creative Flip Chart Idea – Important Issues Page

In a meeting, training, or brainstorming session when someone offers an issue, idea, expectation, concern, or whatever, that is not part of the planned agenda.

Creative Flip Chart Idea – Important Issues Page by The Creative Trainer

I encourage you to create a flip chart entitled Important Issues (I have also heard this type of page referred to as an idea Parking Lot). Tell them that while their item is important and of concern, it is crucial to get through the planned agenda before addressing extra issues.

Creative Flip Chart Idea - Important Issues PageExplain that if time permits at the end of the session you will revisit items on the sheet at the end of the scheduled event. If that is not possible, tell them you will either meet privately or schedule another meeting to address the items, if feasible.

This approach recognizes the importance of their issues without sacrificing valuable program time or getting off track.

For additional creative ideas on using flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and Team Facilitators by Robert W. Lucas

About This Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Robert Lucas was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Robert W. Lucas has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

Using Creative Borders for Flip Charts

Using Creative Borders for Flip Charts

Using creative borders for flip charts is a unique and stimulating way to segment information and complement written messages.  These can range from simple combinations of colored lines (single, double, or combination), patterns, shapes,  and graphic images to the various themed styles available in graphics software.

Using Creative Borders for Flip Charts

Using borders related to your program themes can add color and creativity.  For example, if your session topic is expanding your international sales into an additional foreign market, you might border the page or separate sections of data with a border of that nation’s flag or one of its famous landmarks. For a session related to computer software or other technology, use incorporate images of a computer, cell phone, or other appropriate items into the borders. In sessions on customer service, use smiley faces or other simple characters.

Using Creative Borders for Flip Charts

Clipart images are available online through copyright free sites and on various clipart software packages. You can also create your images own in advance or on the spot if you are artistic.

Using Creative Borders for Flip Charts

Do you say you’re still creatively challenged?  Then cheat! If you want to use a graphic image on your flip chart that needs to be larger or smaller than ones you have created, copied, or printed from a computer, simply make a copy and scan it into your computer. Next, create a slide and project that onto a flip chart page, then lightly trace with a pencil. You can then go over the traced line with a colored marker. If you still have access to an overhead projector, you can also copy your image onto a sheet of transparency film and project it onto the page for tracing.

For more creative training ideas, get copies of The Big Book of Flip Charts or The Creative Training Idea Book.

Flip Chart Use – 4 Creative Tips for Trainers, Presenters, and Educators

Flip Chart Use – 4 Creative Tips for Trainers, Presenters, and Educators

Flip charts have been a highly visible, value-demonstrated visual aid for presenting information in training sessions, businesses, social organizations, schools, and religious institutions for decades. Facilitators, educators, managers, trainers, and others involved in gathering and delivering information in group settings have come to rely on the flip chart as a low-tech reliable tool. It is inexpensive and highly versatile in its usage. Creative Tips for Trainers blog article should help you a lot.

Here are four simple strategies for increasing your effectiveness when using flip charts:

1) To draw large even circles on your flip chart pages when you do not have a protractor handy — modify a standard wooden ruler or yard/meter stick.

Simply drill small holes at incremental points (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 inches or centimeters) in your ruler or yard/meter stick and then place it over your paper.

Next, insert a stick pin, like the ones used to secure the paper to bulletin or cork boards, through the first hole in the ruler or yard/meter stick to secure it to the point you wish to be the center of your circle.

Finally, place the sharp point of a pencil through the hole at the size of the circle you desire (i.e. six inches/centimeters) and rotate the ruler or yardstick around in a fluid motion to draw your circle.

Flip Chart Use – 3 Creative Ways To Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls

2) To reduce wear and damage to your pre-drawn flip charts page try permanently mounting a three-inch strip of masking or painters tape (two-inches in length) horizontally on the back of each page in all four corners.

You can then put a rolled piece of tape on top of each of these whenever you need to use the page and tape it to the wall.

This decreases the chance of ripping a page by removing tape directly from the back after using it.

Flip CHart Use - 4 Creative Tips for Trainers, Presenters and Educators

3) In a training or brainstorming session when someone offers an issue, idea, expectation, concern or whatever that is not part of the planned agenda, create a flip chart entitled Important Issues on the spot.

Tell learners the person offering the information that while their item is important and of concern, it is crucial to get through the planned agenda before addressing extra issues. Also, explain that if time permits at the end of the session you will revisit items on the sheet. If that is not possible, tell them you will either meet privately or schedule another meeting to address the items, as appropriate.

This approach recognizes the importance of identifying and capturing issues of interest to participants without sacrificing valuable program time or getting off track.

Flip Chart Use - 4 Creative Tips for Trainers, Presenters and Educators

4) Use pertinent photos, drawings, or cartoons of people to your flip chart pages in order to support or complement the text on the sheet. Select images that tie into the theme or topic of your session or meeting.

When positioning your images, position them so that the person is facing or looking toward the text. This subtle technique is more visually appealing since the figure seems to be looking at what you wrote.

For additional creative ideas for designing, preparing, using, transporting, and storing flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Meeting Facilitators.

Using Flip Charts Effectively

Using Flip Charts Effectively

Flip charts have been around as a training aid for decades and continue to be a valuable resource for trainers, presenters, educators, facilitators, consultants, and anyone who leads a group meeting. 

Using Flip Charts Effectively

The key to maximizing the benefit of flip charts is to practice with them before a session or meeting and effectively use them during the event.

Using Flip Charts Effectively by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Adult Learning & Training Author

The following are some basic flip chart strategies that can help make you look like a professional while making content visible to your attendees and learners.

  • Use large pointers made of wooden dowel rods with a black tip (available at craft, teacher, and home supply stores) or ones with plastic colored fingers attached. You can also use arrows cut out of posters or other heavy colored paper or other props.
  • If appropriate, tear-off sheets and tape them to walls for future referrals.
  • Put two-inch strips of masking tape on the side or rear of the easel for use in posting torn pages.
  • Consider putting tabs (e.g. a strip of tape attached to the back of the sheet, then folded forward attached to the front edge of the page) on pre-written pages to ease in topic identification. You can then number or label topics on the tabs for easy location when needed. The tabs allow you to quickly refer back to a page later in your presentation and to turn them. Another option is to use the clear colored stick-on strips produced by 3M. Reference the colors in your lesson plan or notes so that you can easily find the desired page.
  • Always have extra water-based flip chart markers and pads of paper available.
  • You may want to write comments or key ideas lightly in pencil in the upper corner of the pages. This allows you to unobtrusively refer to them, as you appear to be looking at the flipchart topics. Your participants will never know you “cheated” since they can’t see the remarks from a

Using Flip Charts Effectively by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas

A creative technique that has been used by experienced trainers and presenters is to use two flip charts in tandem (together) during a session. They either alternate prepared images between the two charts or they have prepared pages on one easel and use the second to capture participant comments or to add more information to a topic during the session.

If you plan to use two easels, I suggest numbering them (1 and 2) and indicating in your lesson plan or session notes which easel you will use to make a point. This can prevent embarrassing confusion during your presentation. The other key in using multiple charts is to PRACTICE with your easels before participants arrive. Additionally, I find it helpful to have the same colored markers on both easels. This prevents me from carrying a marker used to the other easel and leaving it, only to be without it when I return to the second easel later.

If you found the ideas in this article useful, consider buying The Big Book of Flip Charts that has hundreds of strategies and techniques for designing, producing, using, carrying, and storing flip charts. For a printable copy of these tips and others on effective flip charting, click here.