Flip Chart Usage Tip

Flip Chart Usage Tip

Flip Chart Usage Tip

To add a bit of variety, create an acronym from the first letter of each word in a series of words or phrases that you plan to use in your learning event. Spell out the acronym down the left side of a flip chart page writing just the first letters of each word. (i.e. H.O.M.E.S. as an acronym for the Great Lakes in the United States [Heron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie and Superior] and A.D.D.I.E. for the Instructional System Design model [Assess, Design, Develop, Implement and Evaluate]).

As you go through the session content related to the acronym, introduce the word or concept represented by each letter, fill in the remainder of the word (as indicated above).

For more creative ideas and strategies for making, using, transporting, and storing flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

Flip Chart Usage Tip by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Book Author, and Training Industry Blog Author

Listed in Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in the South & Southeast, Bob Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert who specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. He has four decades of experience in customer service, human resources development, and management in a variety of organizational environments. Bob was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the Association for Talent Development (ATD).

Bob has lived, traveled and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as, Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics.

To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

Basic Flip Chart Layout and Design

Basic Flip Chart Layout and Design

A simple way to approach your flip chart design is to think of a phrase summarizing your topic that will grab the audience’s attention.  Next, condense the details of that concept down to the fewest words necessary to convey the thought. Finally, decide on a graphic image that will complement the words and enhance the message.

Basic Flip Chart Layout and Design by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author, and Adult Training Blogger

For example, in a session on employment law that I delivered to employees years ago, I was trying to convey the fact that a 1997 study by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) on Employment Litigation found the following:

  • 4,900 HR professionals were surveyed.
  • Six of ten surveyed reported lawsuits in their organization within the past five years.
  • Fifty-seven percent said that their organization has been sued at least one lawsuit during that period.
  • Of the lawsuits, eleven percent involved sexual discrimination or equal pay disputes.

To flip chart this, I selected a title line and then decided how I was going to condense and succinctly lay the information out visually to aid understanding, The chart below was the result.

Basic Flip Chart Layout and Design

Flip Chart Usage Basics – Three Planning Tips

Flip Chart Usage Basics – Three Planning Tips

Flipcharts have been a standard in adult learning classrooms for decades. They provide an inexpensive and efficient means of gathering and posting information to make ideas and concepts useful for visual learners. To avoid a potential hit to your reputation and credibility, always use a checklist and consider what flip chart content you will need to accomplish your learning objectives. This means preparing your flip charts in advance and being ready to use blank pages to capture ideas as the session proceeds. By applying the following flip chart usage basics when planning your session, you can better ensure a more positive outcome.

Flip Chart Usage Basics – Three Planning Tips by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Adult Learning & Training Author

Flip Chart Usage Basics - Three Planning Tips

1. Gather and organize all materials you will need before the participants arrive. Make sure that you bring a facilitators Tool Kit with you that contains commonly needed items, such as tape, markers, stapler and staples, a ruler, and other things you normally use.

2. Always ensure you have an extra pad of paper available. Before starting a session, make sure that you have several backup flip chart paper pads on hand. This is especially true if you are facilitating a brainstorming, strategic planning, or another meeting where you anticipate gathering a lot of ideas.

3. Ensure that you have a room large enough to post completed flipchart pages. Also, ensure that posting pages to the walls is okay. Some hotel and facility managers will not allow you to adhere to pages on walls out of fear of damaging the surfaces. This paranoia usually results from some careless predecessor of yours who did not use the right type of tape or acted unprofessionally. To prevent damage use a good quality of the blue “painters” tape available in most hardware and home and office products stores.

Like any other aspect of training and education, it is the little things that often mean success or failure. Take the time to plan ahead and you will likely be viewed as more professional in the classroom.

For more ideas on effectively designing, using, storing, and transporting flip charts, check out The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

YOUR THOUGHTS? – Please share any tips for effectively using flip charts in adult learning environments?

Flip Chart 101 – Basic Strategies for Effectively Using Flip Charts – Positioning Your Easel

Flip Chart 101 – Basic Strategies for Effectively Using Flip Charts – Positioning Your Easel

There are many creative ways for trainers, facilitators, presenters, educators, and meeting leaders to enhance what they put onto flip chart paper. However, before getting too fancy you should master some flipchart basics when creating and effectively using a flip chart and flip chart easel. Call this Flip Chart 101 – Basic strategies for effectively using flip charts – positioning your easel.

Effectively Using Flip Charts – Positioning Your Easel

Here are two tips for effectively using your flip charts to convey messages to learners, audience members, or meeting attendees:

Position the Easel in the Correct Location. Lighting affects the visibility of what you write on your flip chart paper.  To ensure that everyone in the room can view your message, think about where you place your easel. Overhead lighting should highlight your page, not cast shadows. This means that your light should shine directly in front of the easel and not come from behind it.

Flip Chart 101 - Basic Strategies for Effectively Using Flip Charts - Positioning Your Easel

 Stand on the Correct Side of the Easel.  If you have ever waited impatiently for someone who is writing on a flip chart page to move aside, so that you could read what they wrote and take notes, you understand the importance of positioning yourself correctly.

If you are right-handed, stand to the left of your easel and extend your arm across the page so that you do not block your participant’s view. If you are left-handed, stand to the right of your easel.

Like anything else in a learning or meeting environment, you increase your effectiveness as a trainer, facilitator, educator, or meeting leader if you use sound facilitation or presentation skills.

For more ideas on effectively making, using, transporting, and storing flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and Team Facilitators.

YOUR THOUGHTS? – Please share any tips for effectively using flip charts in adult learning environments?