Flip Chart Use – 3 Creative Ways To Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls

Flip Chart Use – 3 Creative Ways To Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls

In an era where technology dominates many learning environments, flip charts can still be a powerful communication tool for sharing and gathering information.  The key to maximizing their benefit is to develop the sound design and delivery strategies and practice using the flip charts.

Here are 3 creative ways to attach flip charts pages to walls that can help make sharing information with flip charts more effective.

1) Mount a long strip of double-sided tape approximately seven feet from the floor along the wall. You can then add or remove pages to the wall as needed.

Flip Chart Use - 3 Creative Ways to Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls

2) An easy way to attach paper around the perimeter of any room is to install a thin wooden strip with corkboard (similar to that found on bulletin boards) at a height of approximately seven feet. You can then use bulletin board stick pins or thumbtacks to attach your pages. These strips are usually available in office, art, and school supply stores where presentation materials are sold.

3) To protect flip chart pages that you have designed and plan to use in subsequent sessions, take them to an office supply store (e.g. Staples, Office Depot or Office Max) and have their print shop folks laminate the pages.

Once laminated, purchase a roll of Velcro and cut the “male” portion of the product (the part that has dozens of small barb devices that adhere to rough cloth surfaces) into small strips. Glue strips of the Velcro horizontally in the corners and in the top center on the back of the laminated page.

Attach your laminated sheets to the cloth walls of conference rooms, classrooms, or office cubicles. You can also drape a large piece of rough cloth (e.g. flannel) over a flip chart easel and attach the sheets there.

Flip Chart Use – 3 Creative Ways To Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author

For additional creative ideas for designing, developing, and using flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and team Facilitators.

Creative Flip Chart Tip – Alternative to Post-It Flip Chart Pads

Creative Flip Chart Tip – Alternative to Post-It Flip Chart Pads

Some trainers, facilitators, and educators like using the Post-It flip chart pads with the adhesive strip along the top of pages. These allow you to adhere to pages to a wall without using painters or masking tape. I personally do not like this type of paper since the glue makes it difficult to roll evenly and store, then reuse pre-draw pages that you want to take along to the next session. This type of paper also makes it difficult to flip a page over the top of the easel once you finish writing on it and want to go to another page.

Creative Flip Chart Tip

If you do not plan to re-use your pages after a session, there is a cheaper alternative to these more expensive pads with the glue strip. Buy a standard flip chart pad and a can of repositionable artists adhesive spray.  Before participants arrive, tear off a sheet of paper from the pad and spray the back with the adhesive. Adhere the page to the back of a metal flip chart easel or the pad of paper on an easel. After you have written what you want on it, remove and adhere the page to the wall or other surface.

Always test the spray adhesive on paper that you place on an obscure area of the wall to ensure no damage results – some fabric wall surfaces might discolor (especially if you buy a cheaper brand of spray). Additionally, the spray usually has a strong odor. Always follow instructions on the package and use it in a ventilated area. Also, keep in mind some participants might have allergies or respiratory conditions, so use it before they arrive in a well-ventilated area.

For additional creative ideas on making, using, storing, and transporting flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

Basic Flip Chart Layout and Design

Basic Flip Chart Layout and Design

A simple way to approach your flip chart design is to think of a phrase summarizing your topic that will grab the audience’s attention.  Next, condense the details of that concept down to the fewest words necessary to convey the thought. Finally, decide on a graphic image that will complement the words and enhance the message.

Basic Flip Chart Layout and Design by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author, and Adult Training Blogger

For example, in a session on employment law that I delivered to employees years ago, I was trying to convey the fact that a 1997 study by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) on Employment Litigation found the following:

  • 4,900 HR professionals were surveyed.
  • Six of ten surveyed reported lawsuits in their organization within the past five years.
  • Fifty-seven percent said that their organization has been sued at least one lawsuit during that period.
  • Of the lawsuits, eleven percent involved sexual discrimination or equal pay disputes.

To flip chart this, I selected a title line and then decided how I was going to condense and succinctly lay the information out visually to aid understanding, The chart below was the result.

Basic Flip Chart Layout and Design

Energizer Problem Solving Flip Chart Activity for Training – “Please Help Me Out”

Energizer Problem Solving Flip Chart Activity for Training 

“Please Help Me Out”

Brain research on learning indicates that one way to maximize effectiveness and have participants better gain, retain, recall, and use what they learn in a training program is to actively engage them in the learning process.

Finding interesting and effective ways to extract ideas or solve problems during training can be challenging. By getting learners actively involved in the solution process, you tap their broad reservoir of knowledge and ideas while encouraging them to take ownership of the ultimate solution. Using flip charts to capture ideas during the problem-solving process is a great way to ensure the transfer of learning and make ideas visual and memorable.

Energizer Problem Solving Flip Chart Activity for Training – “Please Help Me Out”

 

Energizer Problem Solving Flip Chart Activity for Training – “Please Help Me Out” by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author

The following activity, titled “Please Help Me Out” is a creative and easy means of engaging learners to identify solutions to workplace situations or problems.

PURPOSE:

To provide an action-oriented means of generating solutions to questions or issues from the group.

OBJECTIVES:

Through a process of shared problem solving, participants will:

  • Play an active role in problem-solving.
  • Contribute potential solutions to peer issues, concerns, or problems.

PROCESS:

Post one blank flipchart page per participant around the room.

Explain to participants that they have five minutes to think of an issue, problem, or question they have related to a given topic, such as enhancing teamwork.  For example, someone might come up with, “How do I get peers to buy into my ideas more often?” or “What techniques could I use to better organize my time on team projects?”

After everyone has an issue, give them 2-3 minutes to select a blank flipchart page and print their item on paper.

Once all ideas are written, go around the room and have the author of each item explain briefly (in less than one minute) what they mean.

After all, statements are clarified, give each person a marker, and instruct participants to go to the flipchart page posted to the right of theirs and stand.

Once in place, tell participants they are to rotate clockwise, writing one idea or suggestion for improvement related to the page topic on each page.

When they finish, they should move to the next sheet of paper.

Repeat this process for 20 minutes or until everyone seems to be running out of ideas.  The reason for continuing to go back to the same sheet numerous times is that reading someone else’s comment may give a participant another idea or suggestion.

Add additional flipchart pages that are necessary if one fills up.

NOTE: 

You may want to put an extra sheet of paper under each posted sheet to prevent possible damage to the wall by ink saturation or “bleeding” through the paper.

MATERIALS NEEDED:

TIME REQUIRED:

Approximately 45-60 minutes.

For additional creative activities using flip charts in training, consider getting a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Facilitators, Trainers, and Presenters.