Flip Chart Usage Basic Tip – Face Your Audience

Flip Chart Usage Basics Tip – Face Your Audience

Flip Chart Usage Basic Tip – Face Your Audience

There are many advanced creative ways to use flipcharts when working with adult learners. Even so, you should never forget one time-tested flip chart usage basic tip – face your audience.

Many trainers make the mistake of writing on a flipchart and talking at the same time. If you do that, your back will be to your learners and people will have difficulty hearing what you say. Instead, write, put your marker down (so you’re not tempted to play with it), face you learners, then speak.

For more suggestions on how to effectively use a flip chart in training, educational and team meeting settings check out The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and team Facilitators.

YOUR THOUGHTS? – Please share any tips for effectively using flip charts in adult learning environments?

Learn All About Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas Now and Understand Why He is an Authority in the Creative Training Skills Industry

Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas has been a trainer, presenter, customer service expert, and adult educator for over four decades. He has written hundreds of articles on training, writing, self-publishing, and workplace learning skills and issues. He is also an award-winning author.  Robert W. Lucas has written thirty-seven books. The book topics included: writing, relationships, customer service, brain-based learning,  and creative training strategies, interpersonal communication, diversity, and supervisory skills. Additionally, he has contributed articles, chapters, and activities to eighteen compilation books. Mr. Lucas is retired from the U.S. Marine Corps in 1991 after twenty-two years of active and reserve service.

Flip Chart 101 – 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

Flip Chart 101 – 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

The rule of thumb that you should always keep in mind when writing information on your flip chart pages it “keep it simple.”  Adding too much data, information, and images only clutter the page and reduces viewer comprehension.

Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages by The Creative Trainer

Here are 4 tips for writing effectively on flip chart pages:

Flip Chart 101 - 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

1) Put only one idea or concept on a page.  Adding too many ideas on a page can detract from your message and confuse participants.

Flip Chart 101 - 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

2) When lettering, use block letters rather that cursive or custom elaborate and/or intricate style lettering. Lettering that resembles Helvetica or Sans Serif-type fonts found in word processing software work well.  These styles are straighter and aid readability and comprehension.

Flip Chart 101 - 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

3) Always leave two- to three-inch margins on each side of the paper to avoid crowding information.

Flip Chart 101 - 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

4) Avoid using the bottom one-third of the page if you are on the same height level as participants. Otherwise, they may either be forced to stand or strain to look around people in front of them or may not be able to see the flip chart at all.

For additional ideas on how to effectively design, develop, use, transport and store flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

Learn This Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Robert Lucas was the President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Flip Chart Use – 3 Creative Ways To Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls

Flip Chart Use – 3 Creative Ways To Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls

In an era where technology dominates many learning environments, flip charts can still be a powerful communication tool for sharing and gathering information.  The key to maximizing their benefit is to develop the sound design and delivery strategies and practice using the flip charts.

Here are 3 creative ways to attach flip charts pages to walls that can help make sharing information with flip charts more effective.

1) Mount a long strip of double-sided tape approximately seven feet from the floor along the wall. You can then add or remove pages to the wall as needed.

Flip Chart Use - 3 Creative Ways to Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls

2) An easy way to attach paper around the perimeter of any room is to install a thin wooden strip with corkboard (similar to that found on bulletin boards) at a height of approximately seven feet. You can then use bulletin board stick pins or thumbtacks to attach your pages. These strips are usually available in office, art, and school supply stores where presentation materials are sold.

3) To protect flip chart pages that you have designed and plan to use in subsequent sessions, take them to an office supply store (e.g. Staples, Office Depot or Office Max) and have their print shop folks laminate the pages.

Once laminated, purchase a roll of Velcro and cut the “male” portion of the product (the part that has dozens of small barb devices that adhere to rough cloth surfaces) into small strips. Glue strips of the Velcro horizontally in the corners and in the top center on the back of the laminated page.

Attach your laminated sheets to the cloth walls of conference rooms, classrooms, or office cubicles. You can also drape a large piece of rough cloth (e.g. flannel) over a flip chart easel and attach the sheets there.

Flip Chart Use – 3 Creative Ways To Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author

For additional creative ideas for designing, developing, and using flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and team Facilitators.

5 Ways to Enhance Your Presentation Flip Charts with Color, Shapes, Borders and Images

5 Ways to Enhance Your Presentation Flip Charts with Color, Shapes, Borders, and Images

There has been quite a bit of research on the impact of color, images, and other graphic additions and the effect that they have on the human brain. Unfortunately, many trainers and educators fail to consider the potential for using visual elements to stimulate brain neurons. Nor do they recognize that adding a splash of different hues to their presentation flip chart pages might actually contribute to learning. The following chart shows the emotions communicated in various colors.

COLOR

EMOTION/MESSAGE

Red Stimulates and evokes excitement, passion, power, energy,   anger, intensity.  Also, it can indicate   “stop,” negativity, financial trouble, or shortage.
Yellow Indicates caution, warmth, mellowness, positive meaning,   optimism, and cheerfulness. It can also stimulate thinking and visioning.
Dark Blue Depending on the shade, you can relax, soothe, indicate maturity, and evoke trust, and tranquility or peace.
Light Blue Cool, youthful, or masculine images can be projected.
Purple Projects assertiveness or boldness, youthfulness, and contemporary image. Often used as a sign of royalty, richness, spirituality,   or power.
Orange It can indicate high energy or enthusiasm. Emotional and sometimes stimulates positive thinking. The organic image can result.
Brown An earth-tone that creates a feeling of security,   wholesomeness, strength, support, and a lack of pretentiousness.
Green Can remind of nature, productivity, positive image, moving forward or “go,” comforting, growth, or financial success or prosperity. Also, can give a feeling of balance.
Gold/Silver Illustrates prestige, status, wealth, elegance, or conservative image.
Pink Projects a youthful, feminine, or warm image.
White Typically used to illustrate purity, cleanliness, honesty,   wholesomeness, enhance colors used, and provide visual relaxation.
Black It represents a lack of color. It creates a sense of independence, completeness, and solidarity. Often used to indicate financial success, death, seriousness, or heaviness of the situation.

Enhance Your Presentation Flip Charts by The Creative Trainer

Take advantage of what researchers have discovered about using colors and visual elements to enhance your learning environment and aid in the acquisition and retaining of information.

Consider the following presentation flip chart tips when you design your next training or presentation visual aids.

1. Use Colored Icons or Bullets in various shapes that relate to your topic in order to visually tie to written text and the program theme. Here are some examples:

• For training on telephone skills, use small telephones or headsets;
• For customer service skills, use small smiley faces or faces with various expressions;
• For travel-related training, use cars, boats, ships, airplanes, etc.
• For EEO or legal training, use justice scales; and
• For technical skills, use small computers or other equipment.

presentation flip chart tips, creative training techniques, brain based learning2. Use Colored Shapes Around Text to set off the words from the surrounding material. For example, you might use clouds, stars, circles, bursting bombs, or geometric shapes drawn in various colors to highlight a concept, word, or phrase.

3. Attach Key Concepts Written on Cut Out Shapes that you then attach to the page with either tape, Velcro, or artist’s adhesive. For example, a creative training content review activity where “bright ideas” might be elicited from learners and written on light bulb cut-outs in various colors. Learners could then come up, attach their idea to a sheet of paper, and discuss their idea. Post the pages for everyone to view and note during breaks.

4. Add Borders to flip chart pages with either colored markers or colored tape. Ypresentation flip chart tips, creative training techniques, brain based learningou can tie to program themes by adding images related to the topic. For example, if you are discussing selling or doing business in another country, choose images that relate to that country.

5. Add Images that are done in various colors. Cartoon characters, caricatures, simple stick figures, and similar figures are great. Go to Microsoft Word® toolbar to Insert/ Picture/Clip Art for ideas. If you cannot draw well and have an overhead projector still sitting around, you can make copies of images on transparency film, project it onto a flip chart page and trace it! You can also create a slide and project it on paper to trace.

By using these simple flip chart presentation tips when designing and developing your flip charts for learning events, you potentially increase the opportunities for learners to gain, retain, recall, and use what they learn.

 

 

Flip Chart 101 – Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

Flip Chart 101 – Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

Rather than displaying prepared flipcharts before you are ready to discuss them, try using the “revelation” technique. As when showing one line of PowerPoint text at a time, you can use a similar technique with flip charts.

Flip Chart 101 - Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

To use the revelation technique, form a small circle of masking tape and attach it to the bottom corners of the page you are displaying — so that the sticky part faces out away from the wall or easel.  Next, bring the taped area up and attach it just below the title line of your page so that the rest of the text remains covered. Thus, you are using the bottom portion of the page as its own cover.

As you are ready to discuss a point, move the taped edge down to display the next line.

For additional ideas on how to effectively design, develop, use, transport, and store flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

Meet Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Brain-Based Adult Training Author

Learn All About Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas Now and Understand Why He is an Authority in the Creative Training Skills Industry!

Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas has been a trainer, presenter, customer service expert, and adult educator for over four decades. He has written hundreds of articles on training, writing, self-publishing, and workplace learning skills and issues. He is also an award-winning author. Robert W. Lucas has written thirty-seven books. The book topics included: writing, relationships, customer service, brain-based learning,  and creative training strategies, interpersonal communication, diversity, and supervisory skills. Additionally, he has contributed articles, chapters, and activities to eighteen compilation books. Mr. Lucas is retired from the U.S. Marine Corps in 1991 after twenty-two years of active and reserve service.

Help Visual Learners Maximize Learning Outcomes

Help Visual Learners Maximize Learning Outcomes

Help Visual Learners Maximize Learning Outcomes

I am always looking for ways to use creative strategies to help visual learners in my adult learning sessions. This is because some research indicates that as many as 40% – 65% of participants depending on what they see to better obtain and process information. For that reason, I thought I’d offer three proven creative strategies that can help visual learners maximize learning outcomes.

1. Create word strips.

If you have access to a solid-backed metal flip chart easel or dry erase board, add some visual variety to your session by creating some content related word or phrase strips. Do this by cutting strips of poster board and writing on them with water-based colored markers, as you would a flip chart. Once finished, attach small strips of magnetic tape to the back of the strips. This product is available at most major office supply stores. You can use an alternative to word strips by drawing images that complement your session content and cutting these out. Put the magnetic tape on the backs. You can then post all of your materials on a metallic surface as you share ideas and content.

2. Use rubber stamp images.

When creating lines of text on your flip charts, add creative bullet point icons or images at the beginning of each line to indicate a new thought or concept. You can either draw these with water-based flip chart markers in various colors or go to a rubber stamp, craft, art, or office supply store to search for ones appropriate to your session content (e.g. stars, smile faces, or shopping carts for a session on customer service in a supermarket). You may want to consider going to a print supplier that makes customer self-inking stamps to avoid having to use an ink pad, which can sometimes be messy or dry out if left open.

3. Make keywords or phrases stand out.

Instead of just putting lines of text down aHelp Visual Learners Maximize Learning Outcomes flip chart page or on a dry erase board, scatter terms offered or shared around the page or surface at different angles. Use various-shaped borders around the term(s) to separate and make them stand out. For example, you might use a cloud, oval, jagged explosion symbol, rectangle or whatever you decide is appropriate. These simple shapes highlight and add visual variety to otherwise nondescript rows of words or text.

For additional ideas on how to enhance your learning environment and training aids and help visual learners maximize learning outcomes, check out other posts on this blog related to learning styles. Also, take a look at The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and Team Facilitators and Energize Your Training: Creative Techniques to Engage Learners.

Flip Chart 101 – Creative Ways to Post Flip Chart Pages On Walls

Flip Chart 101 - Creative Ways to Post Flip Chart Pages On Walls

Flip Chart 101 – Creative Ways to Post Flip Chart Pages On Walls

Designing and drawing creative flip chart pages for adult learning workshops with graphics takes time and effort, depending on how complex you make them. Due to the energy you put into them, you should consider ways to make them as durable as possible so that you can re-use them multiple times.

The following are some simple techniques that can assist in posting your masterpieces, and preventing excessive damage to them so that you can use them more than once.

Permanent masking tape on the back of pages

To reduce wear and damage to your pre-drawn flipcharts page try permanently mounting a three-inch strip of masking tape (two-inch width) on the back of pages at each corner. You can then put a rolled piece of tape over each piece whenever you need to use the page and tape to the wall. This decreases the chance of ripping a page by removing tape directly from the back after use.

Stick pins or thumbtacks

An easy way to attach paper around the perimeter of any room is to install a thin wooden strip with   (similar to that found on bulletin boards) at a height of approximately seven feet. You can then use bulletin board stick pins or thumbtacks to attach your pages. These corkboard strips are usually available in office, art, and school supply stores where presentation materials are sold.

To prevent wear and tear on the corners, place a three-inch-long piece of two-inch-wide masking tape on the front and back corners of the page and stick your pins there.

Double-sided masking tape

While sometimes difficult to find, an alternative to putting tape on each page is to mount a long strip of double-sided tape along the wall at a height of approximately seven feet. You can then add or remove pages to the wall, as needed.

Velcro strips

While not directly related to using flipchart paper, this idea can be used in conjunction with an easel.

For years, Velcro has been used successfully by those who sew clothing. Creative teachers and presenters have also used it in a variety of ways.

One way for you to use this nifty tool is to cut small strips of the “male” Velcro (the part that has dozens of small barb devices that adhere to rough cloth surfaces). Glue or tape these to the back of poster board strips cut large enough to allow you to attach words or phrases to each. You can first write on flipchart paper, then cut to fit the poster board.  Next, attach the pasteboard strips onto a large piece of felt draped over a flipchart easel or apply them directly to a cloth papered classroom wall (if you have these) by simply pushing them up against the rough cloth surface. The barbs of the Velcro cling to the cloth.

This technique allows you to build a storyline or series of steps as you put each up strip, one at a time.

Metal strips

Another, more permanent strategy for hanging flipchart pages is to mount metal strips around your classroom walls. Ensure that you use steel or something other than aluminum since magnets will not still to the thinner coated metals. You can then use a standard kitchen or note magnet to hold the flipchart page to the wall.

Wooden strips

An alternative to the metal wall strips is to use wooden ones. Before mounting, nail or attach standard wooden spring-type clothespins or the heavy-duty metal “bull clips” (available in office supply stores) along the strip. You can then hang flipchart pages, as needed.

Metal dry erase writing boards

Many classrooms these days have magnetic dry erase whiteboards mounted on walls. Simply by some small round magnets and attach your prepared flip chart pages to the boards. If you plan to write on the paper once it is posted, make sure to put an extra sheet of paper under it and use water-based flip chart markers instead of a permanent marker. This can prevent the ink from “bleeding through” onto the boards and damaging them.

For more creative ways to design, develop, use, transport, and store flipcharts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and Team Facilitators.

11 Common Flipchart Uses

11 Common Flipchart Uses

11 Common Flipchart Uses

Flipcharts have been around so long as visual aids for learning that a lot of trainers and adult educators often overlook them as a vehicle for information exchange in learning events. In many instances, they defer to more modern electronic technology for presenting and collecting information.

My personal opinion is that when trainers and facilitators or instructors drop flipcharts from their training aids arsenal, they are making a big mistake. That is because of flip charts as inexpensive, easy-to-use, portable, and require no electricity or add-ons (e.g. screens, laptops, and other presentation aids).

11 Common Flipchart Uses by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author, and Blogger for the Training Industry

In general, flip charts can be used to collect and deliver information successfully because of they:

  1. Support or reinforce the spoken word from instructors, team leaders, facilitators, and others;
  2. Provide a surface where color can be utilized as the user speaks;
  3. Direct participant attention to a specific point;
  4. Serve as a quick review reference that takes revisiting a concept by merely pointing or turning a page;
  5. Allow the addition of images, charts, and other materials to reinforce words on the page, as needed;
  6. Aids comprehension, especially for visual learners;
  7. Communicate new concepts or ideas;
  8. Collect key ideas and concepts offered by individuals and groups;
  9. Help gain consensus by presenting lists that can be easily added too and voted upon in a session;
  10. Engage people in the learning process by allowing them to actively collect and use the information on pages they prepare. Note: This taps into the Malcolm Knowles’ Adult Learning Theory and brain-based learning concepts related to active learner involvement in order to help learners gain, retain, recall and use what they experience;
  11. Give a large, repositionable, standard writing surface (27 inches X 36 inches) that can be used to display information.

If you liked this, you may benefit from thousands of creative ideas for making, using, transporting, and storing flip charts outlined in The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

Quotation About Flip Charts – Robert W. Lucas

Quotation About Flip Charts – Robert W. Lucas

For creative ideas and tips of designing, developing, using, transporting, and storing flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and Team Facilitators.

Quotation About Flip Charts by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author, and Creative Training Blogger – “Flip charts are still an effective, economical and practical way to make your message visual when you are training adults.”

Quotation About Flip Charts - Robert W. Lucas

About This Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Robert Lucas was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Robert W. Lucas has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

Five Tips for Using Flip Charts

Five Tips for Using Flip Charts

Flip charts continue to be a valuable tool for any learning environment or team meeting with less than 30 attendees. Since they are portable, easy to use, economical, and easy to create, flip charts can provide an excellent resource for capturing, displaying and, collecting, and sharing information when working with a group.

Five Tips for Using Flip Charts

Here are five basic tips for creating and using flip charts effectively:

1.  Rather than waste paper when preparing your flip charts in advance, plan what will go on the page on a sheet of writing or computer paper with a pencil. This will allow you to visualize where to place images and text before transferring it to a sheet of flip chart paper.

2.  Select water-based markers specifically designed for flip charts. They will not “bleed through” the page and damage the one behind it. There is no strong offensive odor found with permanent ink markers. You can even buy scented fruit-flavored markets (e.g. Mr. Sketch).

3.  Buy a paper that is already lined to eliminate having to use a straight edge tool to ensure your text does not slant down or up the page.

4.  If you prepare pages in advance, use the 6-8 rule – no more than 6-8 words per line and 6-8 lines per page).

5.  Use dark-colored markers (e.g. black, brown, navy blue, forest green, and red) to make text stand out. Only use lighter colors (e.g. orange, light blue, light green, yellow, or pink) to add emphasis or create images that complement the text.

For additional creative ideas for preparing, using, transporting, and storing flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.