Flip Chart Usage Basic Tip – Face Your Audience

Flip Chart Usage Basics Tip – Face Your Audience

Flip Chart Usage Basic Tip – Face Your Audience

There are many advanced creative ways to use flipcharts when working with adult learners. Even so, you should never forget one time-tested flip chart usage basic tip – face your audience.

Many trainers make the mistake of writing on a flipchart and talking at the same time. If you do that, your back will be to your learners and people will have difficulty hearing what you say. Instead, write, put your marker down (so you’re not tempted to play with it), face you learners, then speak.

For more suggestions on how to effectively use a flip chart in training, educational and team meeting settings check out The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and team Facilitators.

YOUR THOUGHTS? – Please share any tips for effectively using flip charts in adult learning environments?

Learn All About Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas Now and Understand Why He is an Authority in the Creative Training Skills Industry

Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas has been a trainer, presenter, customer service expert, and adult educator for over four decades. He has written hundreds of articles on training, writing, self-publishing, and workplace learning skills and issues. He is also an award-winning author.  Robert W. Lucas has written thirty-seven books. The book topics included: writing, relationships, customer service, brain-based learning,  and creative training strategies, interpersonal communication, diversity, and supervisory skills. Additionally, he has contributed articles, chapters, and activities to eighteen compilation books. Mr. Lucas is retired from the U.S. Marine Corps in 1991 after twenty-two years of active and reserve service.

Flip Chart 101 – 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

Flip Chart 101 – 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

The rule of thumb that you should always keep in mind when writing information on your flip chart pages it “keep it simple.”  Adding too much data, information, and images only clutter the page and reduces viewer comprehension.

Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages by The Creative Trainer

Here are 4 tips for writing effectively on flip chart pages:

Flip Chart 101 - 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

1) Put only one idea or concept on a page.  Adding too many ideas on a page can detract from your message and confuse participants.

Flip Chart 101 - 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

2) When lettering, use block letters rather that cursive or custom elaborate and/or intricate style lettering. Lettering that resembles Helvetica or Sans Serif-type fonts found in word processing software work well.  These styles are straighter and aid readability and comprehension.

Flip Chart 101 - 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

3) Always leave two- to three-inch margins on each side of the paper to avoid crowding information.

Flip Chart 101 - 4 Tips for Writing on Flip Chart Pages

4) Avoid using the bottom one-third of the page if you are on the same height level as participants. Otherwise, they may either be forced to stand or strain to look around people in front of them or may not be able to see the flip chart at all.

For additional ideas on how to effectively design, develop, use, transport and store flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

Learn This Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Robert Lucas was the President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Flip Chart Use – 3 Creative Ways To Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls

Flip Chart Use – 3 Creative Ways To Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls

In an era where technology dominates many learning environments, flip charts can still be a powerful communication tool for sharing and gathering information.  The key to maximizing their benefit is to develop the sound design and delivery strategies and practice using the flip charts.

Here are 3 creative ways to attach flip charts pages to walls that can help make sharing information with flip charts more effective.

1) Mount a long strip of double-sided tape approximately seven feet from the floor along the wall. You can then add or remove pages to the wall as needed.

Flip Chart Use - 3 Creative Ways to Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls

2) An easy way to attach paper around the perimeter of any room is to install a thin wooden strip with corkboard (similar to that found on bulletin boards) at a height of approximately seven feet. You can then use bulletin board stick pins or thumbtacks to attach your pages. These strips are usually available in office, art, and school supply stores where presentation materials are sold.

3) To protect flip chart pages that you have designed and plan to use in subsequent sessions, take them to an office supply store (e.g. Staples, Office Depot or Office Max) and have their print shop folks laminate the pages.

Once laminated, purchase a roll of Velcro and cut the “male” portion of the product (the part that has dozens of small barb devices that adhere to rough cloth surfaces) into small strips. Glue strips of the Velcro horizontally in the corners and in the top center on the back of the laminated page.

Attach your laminated sheets to the cloth walls of conference rooms, classrooms, or office cubicles. You can also drape a large piece of rough cloth (e.g. flannel) over a flip chart easel and attach the sheets there.

Flip Chart Use – 3 Creative Ways To Attach Flip Chart Pages to Your Walls by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author

For additional creative ideas for designing, developing, and using flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and team Facilitators.

5 Ways to Enhance Your Presentation Flip Charts with Color, Shapes, Borders and Images

5 Ways to Enhance Your Presentation Flip Charts with Color, Shapes, Borders, and Images

There has been quite a bit of research on the impact of color, images, and other graphic additions and the effect that they have on the human brain. Unfortunately, many trainers and educators fail to consider the potential for using visual elements to stimulate brain neurons. Nor do they recognize that adding a splash of different hues to their presentation flip chart pages might actually contribute to learning. The following chart shows the emotions communicated in various colors.

COLOR

EMOTION/MESSAGE

Red Stimulates and evokes excitement, passion, power, energy,   anger, intensity.  Also, it can indicate   “stop,” negativity, financial trouble, or shortage.
Yellow Indicates caution, warmth, mellowness, positive meaning,   optimism, and cheerfulness. It can also stimulate thinking and visioning.
Dark Blue Depending on the shade, you can relax, soothe, indicate maturity, and evoke trust, and tranquility or peace.
Light Blue Cool, youthful, or masculine images can be projected.
Purple Projects assertiveness or boldness, youthfulness, and contemporary image. Often used as a sign of royalty, richness, spirituality,   or power.
Orange It can indicate high energy or enthusiasm. Emotional and sometimes stimulates positive thinking. The organic image can result.
Brown An earth-tone that creates a feeling of security,   wholesomeness, strength, support, and a lack of pretentiousness.
Green Can remind of nature, productivity, positive image, moving forward or “go,” comforting, growth, or financial success or prosperity. Also, can give a feeling of balance.
Gold/Silver Illustrates prestige, status, wealth, elegance, or conservative image.
Pink Projects a youthful, feminine, or warm image.
White Typically used to illustrate purity, cleanliness, honesty,   wholesomeness, enhance colors used, and provide visual relaxation.
Black It represents a lack of color. It creates a sense of independence, completeness, and solidarity. Often used to indicate financial success, death, seriousness, or heaviness of the situation.

Enhance Your Presentation Flip Charts by The Creative Trainer

Take advantage of what researchers have discovered about using colors and visual elements to enhance your learning environment and aid in the acquisition and retaining of information.

Consider the following presentation flip chart tips when you design your next training or presentation visual aids.

1. Use Colored Icons or Bullets in various shapes that relate to your topic in order to visually tie to written text and the program theme. Here are some examples:

• For training on telephone skills, use small telephones or headsets;
• For customer service skills, use small smiley faces or faces with various expressions;
• For travel-related training, use cars, boats, ships, airplanes, etc.
• For EEO or legal training, use justice scales; and
• For technical skills, use small computers or other equipment.

presentation flip chart tips, creative training techniques, brain based learning2. Use Colored Shapes Around Text to set off the words from the surrounding material. For example, you might use clouds, stars, circles, bursting bombs, or geometric shapes drawn in various colors to highlight a concept, word, or phrase.

3. Attach Key Concepts Written on Cut Out Shapes that you then attach to the page with either tape, Velcro, or artist’s adhesive. For example, a creative training content review activity where “bright ideas” might be elicited from learners and written on light bulb cut-outs in various colors. Learners could then come up, attach their idea to a sheet of paper, and discuss their idea. Post the pages for everyone to view and note during breaks.

4. Add Borders to flip chart pages with either colored markers or colored tape. Ypresentation flip chart tips, creative training techniques, brain based learningou can tie to program themes by adding images related to the topic. For example, if you are discussing selling or doing business in another country, choose images that relate to that country.

5. Add Images that are done in various colors. Cartoon characters, caricatures, simple stick figures, and similar figures are great. Go to Microsoft Word® toolbar to Insert/ Picture/Clip Art for ideas. If you cannot draw well and have an overhead projector still sitting around, you can make copies of images on transparency film, project it onto a flip chart page and trace it! You can also create a slide and project it on paper to trace.

By using these simple flip chart presentation tips when designing and developing your flip charts for learning events, you potentially increase the opportunities for learners to gain, retain, recall, and use what they learn.

 

 

Flip Chart 101 – Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

Flip Chart 101 – Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

Rather than displaying prepared flipcharts before you are ready to discuss them, try using the “revelation” technique. As when showing one line of PowerPoint text at a time, you can use a similar technique with flip charts.

Flip Chart 101 - Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

Using the Revelation Technique with Flip Charts

To use the revelation technique, form a small circle of masking tape and attach it to the bottom corners of the page you are displaying — so that the sticky part faces out away from the wall or easel.  Next, bring the taped area up and attach it just below the title line of your page so that the rest of the text remains covered. Thus, you are using the bottom portion of the page as its own cover.

As you are ready to discuss a point, move the taped edge down to display the next line.

For additional ideas on how to effectively design, develop, use, transport, and store flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

Meet Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Brain-Based Adult Training Author

Learn All About Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas Now and Understand Why He is an Authority in the Creative Training Skills Industry!

Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas has been a trainer, presenter, customer service expert, and adult educator for over four decades. He has written hundreds of articles on training, writing, self-publishing, and workplace learning skills and issues. He is also an award-winning author. Robert W. Lucas has written thirty-seven books. The book topics included: writing, relationships, customer service, brain-based learning,  and creative training strategies, interpersonal communication, diversity, and supervisory skills. Additionally, he has contributed articles, chapters, and activities to eighteen compilation books. Mr. Lucas is retired from the U.S. Marine Corps in 1991 after twenty-two years of active and reserve service.

Two Key Components of Experiential Learning

Two Key Components of Experiential Learning

Two Key Components of Experiential Learning

Experiential learning environments differ from their traditional learning counterparts in a number of ways. The key is that they focus on engaging participants throughout the learning process so that they become an integral part of the event and actually act to facilitate their own attainment of knowledge, skills, or attitudes.

Here are two typical components that training designers and adult learning facilitators should consider in order to make a learning event more experiential and meaningful.

1. Make learning contextual.

Help learners put the content they experience into terms of their life or workplace in order to recognize how they can immediately apply what they learn. When you only provide information, facts, data, and tools without helping learners see the relationship and importance to them and their jobs, the learning connection is often missed.

One key role of a facilitator in the experiential learning environment is to act as a conduit to continually reinforce how the learning that occurs applies to the workplace. This should be done through subtle questioning, feedback, coaching, and reminding of lessons learned throughout the event. By encouraging reflection and consideration of content, facilitators can aid learners in their efforts to see the application of theory and practices.

2. Address all learning modalities.

Many instructors forget that they typically have a combination of learning styles (e.g. visual, auditory, and kinesthetic) in their sessions.  In designing session content and format, they often fail to create activities and materials that will add value for participants with each modality preference. This often results in participants missing key terms, concepts, ideas, and information in traditional classrooms because the content is not delivered in a manner that will appeal to all learners.

Experiential learning environments offer opportunities where support materials and activities tie to multiple modalities throughout the session so that learners can maximize their learning potential. For example, if they are going to participate in a learning game, role-play or other activity, the facilitator will verbally explain the process, solicit questions about the process before beginning, and also provide a visual (e.g. flip chart or slide) with instructions written and leave it posted or projected for ongoing referral during the activity. This approach reduces confusion and the need to ask for clarification during the activity.

Two Key Components of Experiential Learning by The Creative Trainer

By asking learners to engage in activities and work through various issues, challenges, and problems during the session, facilitators help take them on a unique journey that incorporates all the cognitive, physical, and emotional aspects of learning outlined in a number of learning theories.

In the process, learners identify potential options and gain new knowledge and insights that help them develop their own solutions to issues and situations to which they have been introduced. In effect, they become co-facilitators in their own learning and aid one another in recognizing solutions or developing strategies for applying what they learn once they leave the learning environment.

For creative training strategies and ideas related to on to designing and developing an environment that includes accelerated learning approaches, get copies of The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning, Energize Your Training: Creative Techniques That Engage Learners and Training Workshop Essentials: Designing, Developing and Delivering Learning Events That Get Results.

Creative Flipchart Ideas That Address The Visual Learning Style

Creative Flipchart Ideas That Address The Visual Learning Style

Creative Flipchart Ideas That Address The Visual Learning Style

Adult learning professionals and educators who conduct training sessions are often challenged with discovering ways to attract and hold the attention of their participants. Since the majority of people in any group primarily have a visual learning style preference, using flip charts is a good way to share information with them.

Creative Flipchart Ideas That Address The Visual Learning Style by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author, and Blogger

I thoroughly enjoy the opportunity to prepare flip charts for a training session or presentation. Even though it can be time-consuming, I can express my personality and ideas on paper. Unlike computer programs where you are limited to the graphic and text images included in the program (unless you are a computer wizard and can create your own stuff), with flipcharts, you can be as creative as you like. You are limited only by your imagination (and the time and resources you have available).

For example, one of the most creative techniques I’ve discovered in a while came from an acquaintance (Linda Wells of Lubbock, Texas). Her idea involves preparing flipchart pages before a scheduled session. She uses large cotton balls to coat a flip chart page with food coloring. She then uses a large cotton tip swab dipped in household chlorine bleach to draw letters and images on the colored paper. In effect, Linda creates a “reverse image” that is truly eye-catching and unique.

To enhance your own flip chart skills, I encourage you to take opportunities to practice whenever possible. Pick a couple of clip art images or characters you like from books, the Internet, or another source. Once you have a few ideas…doodle whenever you have time. This means to draw the images on scraps of paper, restaurant napkins, or wherever you have access to a writing surface. Pretty soon, you’ll be able to replicate the images on your flip chart pages with little effort. And remember, your participants are not art critics (well… most are not).

For additional ideas and strategies on making, and using flipcharts in your training or adult learning events, get copies of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and Team Facilitators and The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning.

Five Tips for Using Flip Charts

Five Tips for Using Flip Charts

Flip charts continue to be a valuable tool for any learning environment or team meeting with less than 30 attendees. Since they are portable, easy to use, economical, and easy to create, flip charts can provide an excellent resource for capturing, displaying and, collecting, and sharing information when working with a group.

Five Tips for Using Flip Charts

Here are five basic tips for creating and using flip charts effectively:

1.  Rather than waste paper when preparing your flip charts in advance, plan what will go on the page on a sheet of writing or computer paper with a pencil. This will allow you to visualize where to place images and text before transferring it to a sheet of flip chart paper.

2.  Select water-based markers specifically designed for flip charts. They will not “bleed through” the page and damage the one behind it. There is no strong offensive odor found with permanent ink markers. You can even buy scented fruit-flavored markets (e.g. Mr. Sketch).

3.  Buy a paper that is already lined to eliminate having to use a straight edge tool to ensure your text does not slant down or up the page.

4.  If you prepare pages in advance, use the 6-8 rule – no more than 6-8 words per line and 6-8 lines per page).

5.  Use dark-colored markers (e.g. black, brown, navy blue, forest green, and red) to make text stand out. Only use lighter colors (e.g. orange, light blue, light green, yellow, or pink) to add emphasis or create images that complement the text.

For additional creative ideas for preparing, using, transporting, and storing flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

 

Flip Chart 101 – Designing Professional Looking Flip Chart Pages

Flip Chart 101 – Designing Professional Looking Flip Chart Pages

If you are going to spend time creatively drawing flip charts before the session begins, give some thought to what you will include on them. Find a large flat writing surface and spend some time writing out key points and adding any illustrations you would like on a writing tablet first. This will save wasting expensive flip chart pads when you make errors or decide to change something.Flip Chart 101 - Designing Professional Looking Flip Chart Pages

Designing Professional Looking Flip Chart Pages

The following strategies can assist in making your flip chart pages more effective and project a polished, professional image:

  • Use a straight edge of some sort.  If the paper is not lined, find a yard/meter stick, ruler or another straight-edged tool to ensure that lines of text are evenly spaced and are not at distracting angles.
  • Make sure that you use block lettering that is at least one to two inches high. Visibility is important if you want learners to grasp concepts and refer to your written materials. To help ensure that everyone can see what is on your flip charts from about 30-40 feet use block type font that has straight lines without fancy curls at the ends. This type and size of the lettering will allow a clean image and make reading easier for learners.
  • Use upper case letters or larger font size for title lines and upper and lower case for text lines. In order to help emphasize the words and help visually define the topic. This approach to writing will allow a more natural reading format. Consider the design of books and other publications. They have bold headers followed by text that is in upper and lower case letters. Extensive amounts of text in all capital letters are difficult to read and not normally used.
  • Limit the number of words to six to eight per line and the number of lines of text to six to eight (“six-by-eight rule”). This will provide a less cluttered look, and allow more lines of text to fit onto a sheet of paper.
  • Use horizontal lettering that runs across the page as opposed to vertical lettering that runs down the page from top to bottom. The exception would be if you are discussing an acronym, such as ADDIE (Assessment, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation), and wanted to the letters down the left side of the page and add a line of text for each letter.
  • Use no more than three columns per page. If you are going to use vertical columns of information leave a slight space between each column. Generally, you would only use this format for lists of words, numerical figures, or shorts points rather than sentences.
  • Limit yourself to one topic per page. This will prevent cramming irrelevant information onto the page — it will only confuse your participants.
  • Avoid using the bottom one-third of the page since some participants in the rear of the room will have difficulty seeing it over the heads of others.

For more useful and creative tips and strategies for making, using transporting and storing flip charts get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and Team Facilitators.

Using Fun and Novel Pointers with Your Flip Charts

Using Fun and Novel Pointers with Your Flip Charts

If you like to use pointers to help focus attention on keywords or concepts that you have put on your flip chart pages, you have a variety of options. They run from the mundane to the creative. Here are some of the types that are common and some that are not so common:

Wooden dowel pointers. Most audio-visual and art supply stores carry the wooden pointers. They are typically three feet long and often have a black rubber or painted tip. If you cannot find them at either of these stores, go to a craft, home supply or hardware store and ask for a wooden dowel rod. They are typically used to support thin curtains. The only difference in the two types is that the latter options will not have the black tip. If you want that feature, you can simply buy some flat black paint and touch it up.

 flip charts, flip chart pointers, flipcharts

Collapsible metal pointers. Similar to an antenna on some cars are another common type used by presenters.  Many even have a clip, similar to an ink pen, that allows carrying in the pocket.

pointer

Lighted infrared pointers. These are a newer “fad.” These are battery operated and project a small red beam of light, thereby allowing you to stand across the room and “point” by projecting the red dot on your flip chart page.

laser pointer 2

There are several negative aspects of this type of pointer:

  • One is that even experienced presenters have difficulty holding the light steady. This gives the non-verbal appearance of nervousness and can be distracting as the dot dances around the page.
  • A second downside is that the dots are so small and many people (especially men) have red color blindness and have trouble seeing the dot at all.
  • Finally, a more serious concern is that the laser light can cause eye damage if you accidentally look into it or project into the eyes of an attendee.

Using Fun and Novel Pointers with Your Flip Charts by The Creative Trainer 

If you really want to add some pizzazz and break the monotony of a learning environment, here are several options:

Long pencil. Purchase and use one of these for use as a pointer. These are over five feet long and can be obtained from Great Big Stuff!

Long pencil

Squawkin’ chicken. These loud and hilarious rubber screaming chickens are great as pointers to attract attention and add a bit of humor to your sessions. They are also perfect for regaining attention following small group activities. Simply squeeze them to hear a loud scream that attracts participant attention.

Sqwakin Chicken

Plastic Finger Pointers. These novel 24-inch rubber fingers mounted on colored plastic handles are perfect for pointing at ideas on flip charts and projection screens.

Novelty finger pointers

For additional creative ideas on how to make, use, transport and store flip charts and how to add fun and creativity to your learning events, get copies of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and Team Facilitators and The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning.