This Is Me – Flip Chart Energizer Training Activity

This Is Me - Flip Chart Energizer Training Activity

This Is Me – Flip Chart Energizer Training Activity

One of the valuable side benefits of any training program is that attendees get to know one another better and potentially build or strengthen relationships with one another through networking. By getting participants actively engaged in training, you can tap into brain-based learning research and adult learning theory (andragogy) regarding the benefits of participant involvement.

This activity can be used to energize and involve your participants in virtually any training session or educational class where you would like them to get to better know one another.

This Is Me – Flip Chart Energizer Training Activity by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author, and Blogger

PURPOSE:  To help individuals get to know each other on more of a personal level and to increase interpersonal communication.

OBJECTIVES:  At the end of this activity, participants will:

  • Have more information about their teammates or peers.
  • Recognize similarities among participants.
  • Feel a higher comfort level with their peers.

PROCESS:

  • Before participants arrive at a session, write each of the following questions on three separate flip chart pages:
  1. What did you learn about your group mates that you did not know before?
  2. Why is this type of information not typically shared with others in the workplace?
  3. What can you do to get to know coworkers better?
  • On the fourth sheet of paper, list various bits of information that you want learners to share with one another (e.g. family background, educational background, how long they have been with their organization and what they do, their favorite hobby, or whatever you believe appropriate).
  • Once everyone has arrived, instruct them that they should group with at least two other participants with whom they don’t work or know well.  Note:  As an alternative to self-grouping, you might creatively group participants to ensure that friends or coworkers who know one another well end up in different groups.
  • Once groups are formed, tell participants they have ten minutes to share the information about themselves that you listed on the flip chart page.
  • After ten minutes, regroup participants, display your first flip chart question only, and have each person in the room introduce themselves.  Tell them that as they do so, they should answer the flip chart questions.
  • After all, participants have finished with introductions, unveil the remaining two flip chart questions, and have entire groups give input.
  • Encourage them to use what they heard to strengthen and build relationships during training and later in the workplace.

MATERIALS NEEDED:   

TIME REQUIRED: Approximately 25-45 minutes, depending on group size.

For additional creative energizer training activities using flip charts get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators or visit amazon.com to view training activity and game books.

Creative Way to Add Images To Your Flip Charts

Creative Way to Add Images To Your Flip Charts

If you want to add creative bullet points that tie to a session theme, add novelty, or provide visual enhancement to your written messages, take the time to gather a few tools for your trainer’s toolbox.

Creative Way to Add Images To Your Flip Charts

Go to art, craft, or another store in your area or on the Internet that sells wooden or cloth craft shapes.  There are literally hundreds of items used by artists and craft enthusiasts that can be used to enhance your presentation. For example, plastic or wooden figures of flowers, clothing shapes, furniture, people, equipment, or whatever can be used to trace graphic icons or images. Simply put on a blank flip chart page and trace the shape as you prepare your flip chart pages in advance of a learning event. If you still have access to an overhead projector, project the image to enlarge it on your flipchart paper and trace.

Creative Way to Add Images To Your Flip Charts by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Adult Learning & Training Author

Learn This Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Robert Lucas was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Robert W. Lucas has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

Using Creative Borders for Flip Charts

Using Creative Borders for Flip Charts

Using creative borders for flip charts is a unique and stimulating way to segment information and complement written messages.  These can range from simple combinations of colored lines (single, double, or combination), patterns, shapes,  and graphic images to the various themed styles available in graphics software.

Using Creative Borders for Flip Charts

Using borders related to your program themes can add color and creativity.  For example, if your session topic is expanding your international sales into an additional foreign market, you might border the page or separate sections of data with a border of that nation’s flag or one of its famous landmarks. For a session related to computer software or other technology, use incorporate images of a computer, cell phone, or other appropriate items into the borders. In sessions on customer service, use smiley faces or other simple characters.

Using Creative Borders for Flip Charts

Clipart images are available online through copyright free sites and on various clipart software packages. You can also create your images own in advance or on the spot if you are artistic.

Using Creative Borders for Flip Charts

Do you say you’re still creatively challenged?  Then cheat! If you want to use a graphic image on your flip chart that needs to be larger or smaller than ones you have created, copied, or printed from a computer, simply make a copy and scan it into your computer. Next, create a slide and project that onto a flip chart page, then lightly trace with a pencil. You can then go over the traced line with a colored marker. If you still have access to an overhead projector, you can also copy your image onto a sheet of transparency film and project it onto the page for tracing.

For more creative training ideas, get copies of The Big Book of Flip Charts or The Creative Training Idea Book.

What is a Flip Chart?

What is a Flip Chart?

A flip chart is a stationary training and educational aid used by trainers, educators, presenters, and meeting facilitators to display written messages and visual images to others. They have been in use for over a century in various forms and provide an easily accessible tool for displaying written messages and visual images and capturing ideas on the spot.

What is a Flip Chart

What is a Flip Chart? by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Adult Learning & Training Author

Flip charts are typically mounted on floor standing easels or tabletop pads. Pages can be torn from the pads for use in small group activities and posted on room walls for display and reference.

What is a Flip Chart?

What is a Flip Chart

There are many types of flip chart easels available. They range from simple tripod display types to solid-backed or molded body styles. Most are adjustable to some degree and all have advantages and disadvantages affecting their use.

The standard size for flip chart paper designed for use on an easel is approximately 27 X 34 inches and pages can be blank, lined, or squared (grids on it), depending on the needs of the user.

For additional information on and ideas for designing, preparing, using, transporting, and transporting flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive ide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.

Learn More About this Blogger.

Learn All About Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas Now and Understand Why He is an Authority in the Creative Training Skills Industry

Robert W. ‘Bob’ Lucas has been a trainer, presenter, customer service expert, and adult educator for over four decades. He has written hundreds of articles on training, writing, self-publishing, and workplace learning skills and issues. He is also an award-winning author. Robert W. Lucas has written thirty-seven books. The book topics included: writing, relationships, customer service, brain-based learning, and creative training strategies, interpersonal communication, diversity, and supervisory skills. Additionally, he has contributed articles,
chapters, and activities to eighteen compilation books. Mr. Lucas is retired from the U.S. Marine Corps in 1991 after twenty-two years of active and reserve service.

Flip Chart 101 – Choosing the Correct Flip Chart Marker

Flip Chart 101 – Choosing the Correct Flip Chart Marker

There are generally three types of flip chart markers available that you may encounter in a classroom or meeting environment: (1) Permanent ink (2) Dry Erase and (3) Water-based.

Flip Chart 101 - Choosing the Correct Flip Chart Marker

The following opinions regarding flip chart markers are offered based on my four decades of experience in delivering training and educational programs and facilitating countless meetings.

 Choosing the Correct Flip Chart Marker by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas

Ensure that you purchase and use the correct types of markers for your flip charts. The name of the first type (permanent) should give you a clue that there may a problem with using them for flip charts. The biggest challenges with these markers are that if you get them on clothing, hands, or inadvertently use them on a dry erase whiteboard, they are difficult or impossible to remove. They also “bleed-through” onto subsequent pages, thereby wasting every other page of expensive flip chart paper.

The second type of marker (dry erase) has ink specifically designed for dry erase surfaces and the ink colors are typically not as dark when applied to paper. They also tend to dry out faster, especially if you forget to recap them immediately after use and often have a pungent odor as you write.

The third type of marker (water-based) is the correct type for use on a flip chart page. They come in a variety of brands and colors and can be used to write as well as illustrate your message. Using a variety of colors and adding images to your charts ties to brain research related to the importance of adding color and making ideas visual for learners. This type of marker is also less likely to “bleed through” onto subsequent pages. Some brands (e.g. Mr. Sketch markers) even come in a variety of pleasant scents (e.g. fruit fragrances).

Like anything else in a learning or meeting environment, you increase your effectiveness as a trainer, facilitator, educator, or meeting leader if you use the correct tools.

For more ideas on effectively making, using, transporting, and storing flip charts, get a copy of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers, and Team Facilitators.