Train the Trainer Tips – Illustrating a Flipchart with Graphics

Train the Trainer Tips – Illustrating a Flipchart with Graphics

Train the Trainer Tips – Illustrating a Flipchart with Graphics

Effective facilitation skills are crucial for you to be an effective trainer or educator. One basic skill needed is knowing how to creatively share information with your adult learners so that you tap into their visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learning styles.

Flip charts have been around for decades and continue to serve as an effective and proven low-tech visual aid. To use them to their best advantage, plan to add graphic images related to your written message in order to interest and supplement the concepts being presented.

Illustrating a Flipchart with Graphics

When choosing your graphic images, there are four factors to consider:

  1. Use bold, broad-lined pictures that can be seen from a distance of at least 30 feet. Also, avoid detailed, intricately-lined objects that may blur at a distance — simple is better. Line art is usually the safest approach unless you are giving participants a handout of your charts. Learning to draw simple characters and items is not that difficult.
  2. Choose the images objectively and wisely.  Remember, not every picture evokes the same thoughts or feelings for all viewers, especially in a session with diverse attendees.  Choose more generic graphics that tend to have the same meaning to virtually all viewers.  Avoid controversial social, religious, culturally-oriented, or political images that may cause contentious feelings or misinterpretation.
  3. Be creative and humorous, and utilize your imagination to develop program-related images that add a dash of flair; Even so, keep in mind that some words and images evoke different meanings in different cultures or for varied people, so consider that fact when deciding what to use as an illustration.
  4. Select images that complement your written text or add value to the page. Do not make the mistake of using an image just to fill the page.

For more ideas and strategies for using flip charts and delivering information in a creative manner, get copies of The Big Book of Flip Charts: A Comprehensive Guide for Presenters, Trainers and Team Facilitators, and The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning.

Two Key Components of Experiential Learning

Two Key Components of Experiential Learning

Two Key Components of Experiential Learning

Experiential learning environments differ from their traditional learning counterparts in a number of ways. The key is that they focus on engaging participants throughout the learning process so that they become an integral part of the event and actually act to facilitate their own attainment of knowledge, skills, or attitudes.

Here are two typical components that training designers and adult learning facilitators should consider in order to make a learning event more experiential and meaningful.

1. Make learning contextual.

Help learners put the content they experience into terms of their life or workplace in order to recognize how they can immediately apply what they learn. When you only provide information, facts, data, and tools without helping learners see the relationship and importance to them and their jobs, the learning connection is often missed.

One key role of a facilitator in the experiential learning environment is to act as a conduit to continually reinforce how the learning that occurs applies to the workplace. This should be done through subtle questioning, feedback, coaching, and reminding of lessons learned throughout the event. By encouraging reflection and consideration of content, facilitators can aid learners in their efforts to see the application of theory and practices.

2. Address all learning modalities.

Many instructors forget that they typically have a combination of learning styles (e.g. visual, auditory, and kinesthetic) in their sessions.  In designing session content and format, they often fail to create activities and materials that will add value for participants with each modality preference. This often results in participants missing key terms, concepts, ideas, and information in traditional classrooms because the content is not delivered in a manner that will appeal to all learners.

Experiential learning environments offer opportunities where support materials and activities tie to multiple modalities throughout the session so that learners can maximize their learning potential. For example, if they are going to participate in a learning game, role-play or other activity, the facilitator will verbally explain the process, solicit questions about the process before beginning, and also provide a visual (e.g. flip chart or slide) with instructions written and leave it posted or projected for ongoing referral during the activity. This approach reduces confusion and the need to ask for clarification during the activity.

Two Key Components of Experiential Learning by The Creative Trainer

By asking learners to engage in activities and work through various issues, challenges, and problems during the session, facilitators help take them on a unique journey that incorporates all the cognitive, physical, and emotional aspects of learning outlined in a number of learning theories.

In the process, learners identify potential options and gain new knowledge and insights that help them develop their own solutions to issues and situations to which they have been introduced. In effect, they become co-facilitators in their own learning and aid one another in recognizing solutions or developing strategies for applying what they learn once they leave the learning environment.

For creative training strategies and ideas related to on to designing and developing an environment that includes accelerated learning approaches, get copies of The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning, Energize Your Training: Creative Techniques That Engage Learners and Training Workshop Essentials: Designing, Developing and Delivering Learning Events That Get Results.

Differences Between Traditional Learning and Experiential Learning

Differences Between Traditional Learning and Experiential Learning

Differences Between Traditional Learning and Experiential Learning

Traditional learning for adults has been used for decades with some minor changes introduced during the period. There are significant differences between this form of training and education and experiential or accelerated learning.

Differences Between Traditional Learning and Experiential Learning by The Creative Trainer

In both approaches, learning outcomes are the ultimate goal. Some major differences are that the target audience (individual[s] vs. group [s}) and the learning strategies applied to the learning environment during a training session. Additionally, experiential learning environments are more interactive and engaging for learners and use a variety of learning strategies in order to address multiple learning styles.

For hundreds of approaches for actively engaging learners through experiential learning (accelerated learning) techniques, designing creative training environments which incorporate brain-based learning research, and relating training initiatives to adult learning theory, get copies of The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning and Energize Your Training: Tips and Techniques To Engage Learners.

Learn about Robert W. Lucas

Listed in Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in the South & Southeast, Bob Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert who specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. He has four decades of experience in customer service, human resources development, and management in a variety of organizational environments. Bob was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the Association for Talent Development (ATD). Bob has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

Creating An Enriched Adult Learning Environment Can Aid Learner Retention

Creating An Enriched Adult Learning Environment Can Aid Learner Retention

In the past twenty-five years, brain researchers have made many wonderful discoveries about how the human brain functions and processes information into memory. The result is that adult educators, trainers, and facilitators have redefined what a successful training environment should look like. They have also developed a plethora of brain-based learning strategies to tap into the three primary learning styles (e.g. visual learning, auditory learning, and kinesthetic learning).

Aid Learner RetentionAid Learner Retention

Through the use of accelerated learning approaches that actively engage the brains of adult learners, participants typically become a more intricate component in the learning process. For example, they use learning strategies such as getting participants to work individually or in small groups to identify issues or situations that they commonly encounter on the job, and then work to find solutions. This often encourages them to take ownership of the end product or ideas. Because of that, learners are more likely to use what they come up with and ensure the transfer of training to the workplace. This all relates to the adult learning theory that Malcolm Knowles proposed decades ago.

By using experiential learning techniques and a variety of learning strategies, such as the use of props, incentives, music, color, motion, and others creative training elements, tied to the activities described above, session leaders can increase the chance that adult learners will better gain, regain, recall and use what they experience.

For hundreds of ideas, activities, learning strategies, and suggestions for creating a stimulating learning environment for your adult learners get copies of The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning and Energize Your Training: Creative Techniques to Engage Learners.

Learn about Robert W. Lucas

Listed in Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in the South & Southeast, also known as ‘Bob’ is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert who specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. He has four decades of experience in customer service, human resources development, and management in a variety of organizational environments. Bob was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the Association for Talent Development (ATD).

Robert Lucas has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

Brain Research Points To The Value Of Using Music In Accelerated Learning Training Environments

Brain Based Research Points To The Value Of Using Music In Accelerated Learning Training Environments

Brain Research Points To The Value Of Using Music In Accelerated Learning Training Environments

It has been said that music soothes the savage beast. Whether that is true or not is irrelevant. What is important is that brain-based learning researchers have found a direct correlation between certain types of music and brain functioning.

In 1993, an important study was conducted related to the impact of music on the brain. This experiment resulted in what has been termed the “Mozart IQ Effect” because the famed composer Amadeus Mozart created the music selected for use in the study.

During the research, students at the University of California, Irvine listened to relaxation music, Mozart, or white noise for ten minutes as they performed spatial tasks. Afterward, it was determined that those listening to Mozart outperformed others.

Brain-Based Research Points To The Value Of Using Music

Eric Jensen points out that while this study alone cannot adequately cement the conclusion that listening to music was the reason for improved performance:

  • The effect also occurs in rats exposed to music.
  • People with Epilepsy also show increased spatial reasoning.
  • Twenty-seven studies replicating the original resulted in at least some positive “Mozart Effect.”
  • Subjects of electroencephalogram (EEG) studies, who listened to Mozart and then performed spatial-temporal tasks, showed enhanced brain activity compared to a control group that listened to a short story.

While there is a controversy about the strength of the Mozart Effect, there seems to be little doubt that music can positively impact brain functioning in adult learners. In reality, many researchers now believe that it is not the type of music played in training, instead, it is the melody, harmony, and rhythm of the music that mostly influences the brain.

To learn more about brain-based learning, using creative instructional strategies in training to address different learning styles, and the value of using music in adult learning environments in which experiential learning strategies are employed, get a copy of The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning.

Tying Active Learning to Adult Learning Theory

Tying Active Learning to Adult Learning Theory

Tying Active Learning to Adult Learning Theory

Ever since adult learning pioneer Malcolm Knowles developed his adult learning theory, other practitioners of accelerated learning (also called experiential learning) have validated his theoretical tenets and expanded on the breadth of knowledge related to the topic.

One key element of Knowles’ findings is that by actively engaging adult learners through the use of a variety of learning strategies in which adult learning games and other creative techniques engage participants, the potential for transfer of training is increased.

Tying Active Learning to Adult Learning Theory by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author, and Blogger

When married to brain-based learning strategies and the addition of common environmental elements, such as light, color, smells, music, fun, novelty, and others, adult learning styles are engaged and brain functioning is potentially enhanced. An outcome of such environments is that learners are more likely to gain, retain, recall, and use what they have experienced.

For specific brain-based learning ideas and strategies, get copies of Creative Learning: Activities and Games That Really Engage Learners, The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning and Energize Your Training: Creative Techniques to Engage Learners.

Three Key Aspects of Experiential Learning

Three Key Aspects of Experiential Learning

Three Key Aspects of Experiential Learning

As you may have read in previous posts on this blog, by using experiential learning or accelerated learning strategies, you increase the potential that your learners will better gain and assimilate what they experience.

Three Key Aspects of Experiential Learning by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author, and Blogger

Here are three key elements of experiential learning:

Make learning contextual.

Help learners put the content they experience into terms of their life or workplace in order to recognize how they can immediately apply what they learn.

Address all learning modalities.

Many instructors forget that they typically have a combination of visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners in their sessions. By designing adult learning events that incorporate activities and elements that appeal to the senses and all three learning styles or modalities, instructors and adult educators can better gain and maintain attention. This helps ensure absorption and future use of what learners experience.

Create a positive learning environment.

Learning is encouraged and facilitated much better in an environment that is relaxed, yet stimulating socially, emotionally, physically, and mentally.  If you are looking for additional information on how to incorporate experiential learning into your adult learning events, check out these resources.

Learn This Blogger – Robert W. Lucas

Robert W. Lucas is an internationally-known author and learning and performance expert. He specializes in workplace performance-based training and consulting services. Furthermore, he has four decades of experience in human resources development, management, and customer service in a variety of organizational environments. Robert Lucas was the 1995 and 2011 President of the Central Florida Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD).

Robert W. Lucas has lived, traveled, and worked in 28 different countries and geographic areas. During the past 40 years, Bob has shared his knowledge with workplace professionals from hundreds of organizations, such as Webster University, AAA, Orange County Clerk of Courts, Walt Disney World, SeaWorld, Martin Marietta, all U.S. military branches, and Wachovia Bank. In addition, Bob has provided consulting and training services to numerous major organizations on a variety of workplace learning topics. To contact Bob visit his website at www.robertwlucas.com or his blog www.thecreativetrainer.com.

Maximizing Adult Learning Outcomes

Maximizing Adult Learning Outcomes

Maximizing Adult Learning Outcomes

There are many creative training strategies that can be applied in adult learning classrooms, which can help participants maximize outcomes and retain what they learn. Each time you facilitate a learning event in which you use a variety of training techniques you improve the chances of success.

Maximizing Adult Learning Outcomes by The Creative Trainer

By applying brain-based learning concepts, tapping various learning styles (modalities) and creating an interactive environment, you likely increase the chances that participants better gain, retain, recall, and use what they learn.

Here are three proven approaches for stimulating and engaging adult learners:

Apply behavioral modeling in the classroom.

By using the concepts of behavioral modeling in which a process or skill is explained, and then demonstrated after learners are probed for any questions they have, trainers can communicate to all three learning modalities (visual, auditory, and kinesthetic).

Once the demonstration is over, the trainer should again elicit questions from learners before having them actually try the skills and observing. Following their performance, feedback is given, any necessary corrections made, and then the entire process is repeated again, as appropriate. This cycle continues until the trainer and learners are comfortable with their ability to perform the task successfully.

Use open-ended questions.

Open-ended questions typically start with words like who, when, where, how, and why, as opposed to closed-ended questions that start with verbs (e.g. do, should, or could). By asking open-ended questions to stimulate dialog and encourage thought exchange, a trainer or facilitator can maximize the knowledge and talent in a classroom.

Incorporate games and activities.

By making learning a fun event while providing a vehicle for the exchange of ideas you can encourage participation and stimulate the neurons of the brain. The key to any activity or game is that they must relate directly to training content. Training time is too valuable to waste.

Everything you do in the classroom must have a direct correlation to the topic and you should debrief the activities to explain that relationship. Do not assume that everyone will know your intended outcome; they won’t and they could walk away from the learning event frustrated and not be willing to participate again in the future.

For more ideas on effectively designing, developing, and delivering training for adult learners, get copies of Training Workshop Essentials: Designing, Developing, and Delivering Learning Events That Get Results and The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning. 

Learning Retention Quote – David Sousa

Learning Retention Quote – David Sousa

The brain is an incredible organ that has the ability to multi-task, create, envision, retain, and perform many other functions. Even so, it needs help to effectively capture and retain information. When designing learning events, trainers and educators should always remember that the manner in which they design, develop, and deliver their message is crucial in helping their learners gain retain, recall and use what they experience.

Learning Retention Quote – David Sousa by The Creative Trainer – Robert W. Lucas, Awarding Winning Author, and Creative Training Blogger

In addition to content elements, facilitators, trainers, and educators should remember to address behavioral and adult learning styles and brain-based environmental factors that potentially impact brain functioning. For example, brain researchers have identified many elements that can impact how the brain receives, processes, and retains information. Some elements include color, sound motion, movement, light, and other environmental components that can either potentially stimulate or impede learning and retention.

Tied to the concept of retention is a quote from noted learning brain author, David Sousa: “During a learning episode, we remember best that which comes first, second best that which comes last, and least that which comes just past the middle.”

Learning Retention Quote - David Sousa

For additional ideas and information,  related to creating a stimulating adult learning environment, get copies of The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning, Energize Your Training: Creative Tips and Techniques to Engage Learners and Training Workshop Essentials: Designing, Developing and Delivering Learning Events That Get Results.

 

 

Maximizing Outcomes in Adult Learning Environments

Maximizing Outcomes in Adult Learning Environments

Maximizing Outcomes in Adult Learning Environments

Preparation is the key to success in virtually everything you do in life. Training design and delivery are no different.  If you fail to prepare; your program is likely doomed to failure. It does not matter how smart you are or how much you know about a topic, if you do not take the time to design an effective interactive program based on actual learner needs, your efforts are wasted.

By analyzing the outcomes of brain-based research on how the brain best processes, stores and uses information, you can apply creative strategies to potentially enhance your adult learning environments. Such applications can help maximize learning outcomes. Additionally, planning creative activities, creating brain-based learning environments and using techniques that engage your learners are key strategies for ensuring that your learners get the most from their experience and that they will later be able to recall and use their new knowledge.

Planning creative activities, creating brain-based learning environments and using techniques that engage your learners are key strategies for ensuring that your learners get the most from their experience and that they will later be able to recall and use their new knowledge. Always use an innovative approach throughout the ISD (Instructional System Design) process and add variety so that you can address various learning styles and preferences. Also, remember to think like your learners, have an alternate plan in case you need to modify something before and during the session, and use a variety of learning strategies. By doing these things, you can positively impact the learning outcomes in your session.

For more ideas on applying brain-based or creative learning strategies that can aid in enhanced learning outcomes, get copies of The Creative Training Idea Book: Inspired Tips and Techniques for Engaging and Effective Learning and Training Workshop Essentials: Designing, Developing and Delivering Learning Events That Get Results.